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Post By
Menshevik

Member Since: Sat May 17, 2008
Posts: 3,915
In Reply To
America's Captain 
Maintainer

Location: Bayville New Jersey
Member Since: Sat May 17, 2008
Posts: 10,872
Subj: Re: Has House Of M And Decimation Been Undone, Or Is It Still In Play Or Being Referenced?
Posted: Tue Dec 05, 2017 at 04:36:46 am EST (Viewed 75 times)
Reply Subj: Re: Has House Of M And Decimation Been Undone, Or Is It Still In Play Or Being Referenced?
Posted: Mon Dec 04, 2017 at 02:43:51 pm EST (Viewed 128 times)



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      It did make a difference to the X-Men's mission statement. From the beginning the X-Men were about locating mutants (preferably as soon as their powers manifested themselves), contacting them, preventing mutant supervillains from recruiting them for their purposes, and offering to school them in the use of their powers. If you had ten thousand mutants in the next town and did not show them, you would still have to explain why the X-Men would now effectively be telling them: "You're on your own, if you're pursued by violent mutiphobes don't bother us, we won't help you and we also don't care if you join Apocalypse's legions even though statistical probability would indicate that 10,000 mutants should contain at least 500 strong enough to jointly wipe out the X-Men in one fell swoop."



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    You should re-read the above and decide if a reasonable person would infer that the X-Men tried to contact every mutant.


Maybe you should re-read the above and decide if you're not trying to bend my argument out of shape in order to dismiss it without going into it. I did not claim that the X-Men tried to contact every mutant (although Cyclops did precisely that post-Decimation when he offered safe haven with the X-Men to every mutant via the international media).

But there obviously were a lot of stories, especially in the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s, where the X-Men actively sought out neophyte mutants, often in competition with Magneto or the Hellfire Club - vide UXM #129 where the team split up to contact two newly manifested mutants in New York (Dazzler) and Chicago (Kitty Pryde) simultaneously. And if they did not contact them immediately, they generally kept seemed to keep tabs on them so that they could contact them when necessary (vide GSXM #1, where Xavier could assemble a new team at short notice after the originals were defeated by Krakoa).

Also, since the X-Men generally act as self-appointed spokesmen for all mutants, you would have to reckon with quite a number of mutants initiating the contacts themselves since they would be the most obvious people to contact if you suddenly find yourself gifted with unusual powers or an outward appearance that causes lynch mobs to materialize.


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      Few problems can be made to go away by steadfastly ignoring them.



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    Which implies that the existence of a mutant is a problem. I think most mutants are probably irrelevant. "Oh look, I have the power to turn my exhales yellow. Someone snap a photo!"


What we've seen of mutants in the comics does not support this all too convenient assumption. Nearly all mutant powers shown in-story where useful to some extent, in most cases useful for a fight (even Cypher's multilingualism).

In any case, for me the crucial question is this: What is the point of having thousands or millions of background mutants who never do anything? All writers apparently can think of doing with them is killing them off in large numbers (the Mutant Massacre, the Genoshan Genocide) or depowering them (X-Men 3: The Last Stand, the Decimation).


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      Also, where do you get the figure of six million from? I thought that the 16 million killed in Genosha were less than half of the world's mutant population according to Morrison et al., so there should be at least 16 million (now mostly depowered) mutants around? Or am I misinformed?

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      It was me who was misinformed. When I wrote the above, I didn't know about the 16 million in Genosha and the idea that this was less than half of all mutants. You mention the 16 million further down. I should have edited my comment accordingly. Sorry. So let's say there were 40 million mutants in the world. That's a pretty ridiculous number, but still, if we assume six billion people in the world, then there would be one mutant to every 149 humans. It would still be possible - but just barely - to go your whole life without ever meeting a mutant. In any case, I agree, 40 million is stupid. This is the kind of mindless nonsense Morrison and his ilk just love to vomit onto the Marvel Universe.


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        This ratio would mean that there are roughly 20,000 mutants living in the New York Metropolitan Area alone, so the school in Westchester would be too small to cope even with just local/regional demand (recall that there was no indication of there being nearly that many mutants before Morrison - writers tended to work with less than a million mutants worldwide, and some with significantly less than a million - so most of these 20,000 would be in their teens or at most early 20s).



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    You should re-read the above and decide if a reasonable person would infer that the X-Men tried to contact every mutant.


Would a reasonable person infer that a significant number of these mutants would not contact the X-Men wanting to become students at their school? With thousands and millions of mutants around one would have to answer the question why the X-Men take a relative handful of them into their school but leave the rest to fend for themselves.


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      Less importance to the global storylines means that there is even less reason to amp the number of mutants to Morrison's insane levels again than there was immediately after the Decimation.



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    There's no reason to ever amp up to 40 million, or 16 million, or even one million. Just bring back the mutants we already know.


To do that it would not be necessary to undo the Decimation, in other words there is no positive reason to undo it other than to satisfy a few disgruntled old fans (I can say that, I'm one myself). Since the more important negative effects of the Decimation have been repaired (new mutants are appearing again), there is nothing left that needs to be "fixed" on a global scale, it can all be done with individual changes.


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      If there are persons in possession of a superpower in the Marvel Universe they tend to use those powers (narratively it is a bit like "Chekhov's gun"), people who don't ever use them are extremely rare. So you would have to explain to the readers WHY there are millions of superpowered mutants who will not use their powers, even to protect themselves or their loved ones.



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    Not everything has to be explained. But more to the point, the mutant whose power is to dry clean your jacket - or wake up small birds from a sound sleep by whistling - is not a threat to either side, the good guys or the bad guys.


Then you'd have to explain why these new mutants all have useless powers, very much contrary to what we've seen before. Also, even mutants with "useless" powers could find themselves subjected to discrimination(1) or physical violence because of their powers or their "mutated" appearance, and they would thus be in need of protection and expect to find it from the X-Men (who presume to speak on their behalf).

(1) If the Decimation were to be undone, we'd probably immediately see a revival of the Mutant Registration Act, for instance, at least that's what I think would happen.


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      Oh please! If someone wants to bring back El Aguila, there is nothing to stop them. The little extra effort it would take to repower him is far from prohibitive (are you going to claim that he wasn't worth that effort? \:\-\) ) If what I see from wikipedia and the Marvel Universe wiki is correct, he had not been seen before M-Day since 1988, i.e. a full seventeen years, and all we got to see was a panel in The New Avengers #18 (2006) - which the Marvel Universe wiki does not even consider conclusive evidence that El Aguila was in fact depowered.



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    The whole thing is just tedious. Mutants should have just stayed mutants and kept their powers. Marvel should simply have announced that Morrison was nuts, there were never 16 million mutants in Genosha. There didn't have to be an in-story solution. Some stories writers write are too stupid to be allowed to persist.


Nevertheless they are canon until they are undone in-story, calling for an out-of-story solution is not a realistic option. Also, much as we dislike Morrison's New X-Men, they were a commercial and critical success at the time (also very much supported by the most vocal part of fandom, at least that is the impression I got), so it wasn't going to happen immediately after Morrison left, and now it is too late to declare those stories no longer canon since pretty much everything that happened afterwards in the X-books is at least to a small extent built on it.


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