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The Avenger


Location: New Jersey
Member Since: Thu Dec 02, 2021


Just as I view this board as the de facto music board for our community, I see it also as the book board.

Do you read prose fiction? What genres do you favor?

My own favorite is sword and sorcery. I came to it through comic books - specifically Conan - but over the years I've enjoyed many authors and many characters. I don't know if you're aware, but there's a sword and sorcery magazine currently publishing, called Tales from the Magician's Skull. Here's a link:
https://goodman-games.com/store/product/tales-from-the-magicians-skull-no-7-pdf/

It funds its new issues through Kickstarter.

As a boy, I was an avid sci-fi reader. Lately I've less interest in reading that genre. I satisfy my sci-fi appetite through television and movies. Back when I was a boy, this wasn't as easy to do. We didn't have an endless variety of sci-fi shows and films available on streaming services like we do today.

Do you read less of any genre because nowadays it's readily available on the screen?



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zvelf


Member Since: Sat May 17, 2008


I still prefer reading actual books to reading stuff on the screen, but I mostly read nonfiction. Some of my favorite fiction in recent times are the short stories of Ted Chiang. I highly recommend both his Stories of Your Life and Others and ExhalationStories of Your Life was adapted into the film Arrival, but the short story is far better even though Arrival is a pretty good movie. Stories of Your Life is his single best story in my opinion, but Exhalation has more stronger stories than his first compilation.




How to make an entrance: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=49xWJJvpjzI
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Incriptus


Location: Incriptus
Member Since: Sat May 17, 2008
Posts: 4,735


At least I can't read any more. Perhaps a lack of attention, but books, especially novels talk too much. I need my entertainment to "get to the point" and that seems to be something that "good writing" actively avoids. They want to "paint you a picture" spending paragraphs describing a desert for example.




Only Drax the Legend can quote Drax the Legend. NT · Drax the Legend
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Superman's Pal

Moderator

Member Since: Sat May 17, 2008
Posts: 5,780


I was going to say I don't read much anymore but I read lots of articles and things online. But books, not so much.

The most recent was probably I got on an H.G. Wells kick and I read three different versions of The Time Machine. Two were the original magazine serials before it got collected into the book, which I had to find online. Then I read his Dr. Moreau and I only got halfway through War of the Worlds.

The last time I was reading a lot of books was the early 2000s when I was really into pro wrestling and I read about 20 wrestler bios.

When I was younger I read a lot of Stephen King novels and all of Douglas Adams' books. I didn't branch out too much. I was always a very slow reader. My brother and my other friend could get through a novel in one sitting. It would take me weeks. I think my mind always wandered too much. Maybe that's why I liked comics better. The artwork kept me focused on the story.




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Zelandoni

Moderator

Member Since: Sat May 17, 2008


My favorite genre is fantasy.
Some examples:

-Earth's Children by Jean M. Auel
-Northern Lights and The Book of Dust by Philip Pullman (BBC's His Dark Materials is based on the first of these trilogies)
-Tolkien's Lord of the Rings (of course) I read these books long before the movies came out. The movies are great, the books are better. They usually are IMO. Another reason I prefer books (and read them first if a movie is already available) is that you can use your imagination, you are not stuck with images in your head that you have seen on television.

I also enjoy a good Stephen King or Dan Brown novel when I'm in the mood.

When I was younger I also read a lot of William S. Burroughs, Tom Wolfe, Jack Kerouac,..but I prefer books of a more lighthearted nature now. The main reason I read books is to relax.

One more book I'd like to mention is The Celestine Prophecy by James Redfield. It came out when I was about 20 years old and it left a big impression on me then.





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Grey Gargoyle


Member Since: Sat May 17, 2008


I recently bought Nick Cave's "And the ass saw the angel" but I have not yet read it.

Before that, I read:
- The Long Earth series by Stephen Baxter and Terry Pratchett,
- Anno Dracula series by Kim Newman.




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The Avenger


Location: New Jersey
Member Since: Thu Dec 02, 2021



    Quote:
    At least I can't read any more. Perhaps a lack of attention, but books, especially novels talk too much. I need my entertainment to "get to the point" and that seems to be something that "good writing" actively avoids. They want to "paint you a picture" spending paragraphs describing a desert for example.



That's one reason I like sword and sorcery. As you say - it gets to the point. The sword-point, so to speak. The authors know and respect their audience, most of whom are fans of things like comic books, video games, action films, and tabletop RPGs.





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The Avenger


Location: New Jersey
Member Since: Thu Dec 02, 2021



    Quote:
    The most recent was probably I got on an H.G. Wells kick and I read three different versions of The Time Machine. Two were the original magazine serials before it got collected into the book, which I had to find online. Then I read his Dr. Moreau and I only got halfway through War of the Worlds.



My favorite book in this vein is Jules Verne's The Mysterious Island, which I recommend for anyone who finds inspiration in the triumph of human ingenuity. I especially recommend it for fans of Iron Man, as Tony Stark is the modern day epitome of what The Mysterious Island glorifies.



    Quote:
    When I was younger I read a lot of Stephen King novels and all of Douglas Adams' books. I didn't branch out too much. I was always a very slow reader. My brother and my other friend could get through a novel in one sitting. It would take me weeks. I think my mind always wandered too much. Maybe that's why I liked comics better. The artwork kept me focused on the story.



I can see that. Also comic books are quicker reads. And most of the information is delivered visually instead of verbally.

What I like about prose fiction is the window into the protagonist's head that we often (though not always) get. I want very much to know what the hero is thinking. It is of course true that some comic books provide this.




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The Avenger


Location: New Jersey
Member Since: Thu Dec 02, 2021



    Quote:
    I recently bought Nick Cave's "And the ass saw the angel" but I have not yet read it.



I looked it up on Amazon:
https://www.amazon.com/Ass-Saw-Angel-Nick-Cave/dp/1880985721

It doesn't sound like something I'd want to read. But I'd be interested to hear what you think of it, if/when you read it. If you like it, maybe your review will whet my appetite for such a story.



    Quote:
    Before that, I read:
    - The Long Earth series by Stephen Baxter and Terry Pratchett,
    - Anno Dracula series by Kim Newman.



Those both sound intriguing.

I looked up Anno Dracula on Wikipedia:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anno_Dracula_series




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atrimus


Location: Saint Louis, MO
Member Since: Sat May 17, 2008
Posts: 2,479


Outside of a few series, I tend to think stories are better told via books than TV/movies. I tend to like lending my own imagination to the story versus seeing a movie director’s interpretation. LotR is one of the few exceptions, which is to say I think it’s as good as the books, and a good companion work.

I was heavy into books in the late 90s and early 00s, but now I don’t read as much. High fantasy is my preferred genre by a country mile: my favorite series being Wheel of Time, Tolkien-verse, The Death Gate Cycle, some of the earlier Dragonlance novels, Wayfarer Redemption, and a few others that escape me atm. I gave A Song of Fire and Ice a go way back when, but I didn’t care for it at the time; I just found descriptions of sex between Daenerys (described as 15) and Drogo to be off putting. Since the HBO series, and reading more about general life during the medieval period, I’ve gone back to the first book and thoroughly enjoy it.



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The Avenger


Location: New Jersey
Member Since: Thu Dec 02, 2021



    Quote:
    My favorite genre is fantasy.
    Some examples:



    Quote:
    -Earth's Children by Jean M. Auel



Oh man! I remember those! I didn't read them all. I think I stopped after the third. My favorite by far was the first, because it focused on the Neanderthals.



    Quote:

    -Northern Lights and The Book of Dust by Philip Pullman (BBC's His Dark Materials is based on the first of these trilogies)



Those I didn't read.



    Quote:

    -Tolkien's Lord of the Rings (of course) I read these books long before the movies came out. The movies are great, the books are better. They usually are IMO. Another reason I prefer books (and read them first if a movie is already available) is that you can use your imagination, you are not stuck with images in your head that you have seen on television.



I've read Lord of the Rings three times, enjoying it more each time. Like you, I prefer reading the books to watching the movies. I agree with you completely in this instance, about preferring my own imagination to Peter Jackson's. Which is not to denigrate his achievement. It's stupendous. It just didn't always ring true to my own inner eye and ear. How could it really hope to?



    Quote:
    One more book I'd like to mention is The Celestine Prophecy by James Redfield. It came out when I was about 20 years old and it left a big impression on me then.



How fictional do you consider that? Completely or only partially?



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The Avenger


Location: New Jersey
Member Since: Thu Dec 02, 2021



    Quote:
    Outside of a few series, I tend to think stories are better told via books than TV/movies. I tend to like lending my own imagination to the story versus seeing a movie director’s interpretation. LotR is one of the few exceptions, which is to say I think it’s as good as the books, and a good companion work.



I also like how prose fiction can go in depth into things the movies will only briefly mention or show just a glimpse of. Often these in-depth studies are tangential to the main plots, yet nevertheless I will consider them the most meaningful parts of the stories.



    Quote:
    I was heavy into books in the late 90s and early 00s, but now I don’t read as much. High fantasy is my preferred genre by a country mile: my favorite series being Wheel of Time, Tolkien-verse, The Death Gate Cycle, some of the earlier Dragonlance novels, Wayfarer Redemption, and a few others that escape me atm. I gave A Song of Fire and Ice a go way back when, but I didn’t care for it at the time; I just found descriptions of sex between Daenerys (described as 15) and Drogo to be off putting.



I enjoyed the original Game of Thrones novel. (Book I of A Song of Fire and Ice.) But then my interest started to wane. The decline of my absorption began with the death of Eddard Stark, who was my favorite character. Actually the Starks were the only characters I cared about at all, except for Tyrion. So when the book was focusing on other characters, it was a bit of a chore for me to keep reading. Also I wanted just a little more magic. I didn't need a ton more, but certainly more than the novels gave us.



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The Avenger


Location: New Jersey
Member Since: Thu Dec 02, 2021



    Quote:
    I still prefer reading actual books to reading stuff on the screen, but I mostly read nonfiction. Some of my favorite fiction in recent times are the short stories of Ted Chiang. I highly recommend both his Stories of Your Life and Others and ExhalationStories of Your Life was adapted into the film Arrival, but the short story is far better even though Arrival is a pretty good movie. Stories of Your Life is his single best story in my opinion, but Exhalation has more stronger stories than his first compilation.



I am terribly out of touch with sci-fi. I had to look up Ted Chiang in Wikipedia to even know what genre he wrote in.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ted_Chiang

What do you like best about his stories? I can see he's won many awards.




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Superman's Pal

Moderator

Member Since: Sat May 17, 2008
Posts: 5,780



    Quote:

      Quote:
      The most recent was probably I got on an H.G. Wells kick and I read three different versions of The Time Machine. Two were the original magazine serials before it got collected into the book, which I had to find online. Then I read his Dr. Moreau and I only got halfway through War of the Worlds.



    Quote:

    My favorite book in this vein is Jules Verne's The Mysterious Island, which I recommend for anyone who finds inspiration in the triumph of human ingenuity. I especially recommend it for fans of Iron Man, as Tony Stark is the modern day epitome of what The Mysterious Island glorifies.


I did a review of the Mysterious Island movie not long ago but I didn't read the book. In the movie it seems the survivors are not so much doing for themselves but benefitting from the mysterious stranger helping them. Is this like the book? Would you say Nemo is the Tony Stark analogue?

Wouldn't Robinson Crusoe be the granddaddy of island survival stories?


    Quote:


      Quote:
      When I was younger I read a lot of Stephen King novels and all of Douglas Adams' books. I didn't branch out too much. I was always a very slow reader. My brother and my other friend could get through a novel in one sitting. It would take me weeks. I think my mind always wandered too much. Maybe that's why I liked comics better. The artwork kept me focused on the story.



    Quote:

    I can see that. Also comic books are quicker reads. And most of the information is delivered visually instead of verbally.



    Quote:
    What I like about prose fiction is the window into the protagonist's head that we often (though not always) get. I want very much to know what the hero is thinking. It is of course true that some comic books provide this.

Yeah I don't know why the entire comic industry suddenly decided thought balloons should vanish all at once.

I like that with novels you can think up the visuals yourself but again, my mind wanders. I suddenly find myself on a page that I haven't read and I realize I skimmed the last 3 pages on autopilot and I didn't retain any of it and have to go back. I did better last time I was reading Wells.


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Happy Hogan 

Manager

Location: Northern Virginia
Member Since: Sat May 17, 2008
Posts: 4,441



Way back in the day I used to read mystery/detective stories, along with science fiction. I found Ellery Queen's Mystery Magazine at a local used bookstore. I also read The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy after seeing it on my local PBS station, along with various Star Trek short stories collections.   Sadly I don't seem to read as much these days.

If I ever get time I may try my hand at writing fan fiction. Or maybe not, the fan fiction I write would probably look like parody.




Ancient One 

Manager

Member Since: Sat May 17, 2008
Posts: 7,886



    Quote:
    Do you read prose fiction? What genres do you favor?


Yes. Lots. I must have read hundreds of books in my lifetime. With lots more to come, hopefully.

Genres? Well, I started reading through comics, but at a pretty young age I got into science fiction, horror, sword and sorcery. Basically anything with a fantastic element to it.

Eventually I started to gravitate towards the classics, auto/biography (Especially music bios) and science.

These days my reading is mainly science papers (There's some amazing stuff happening in astrophysics and physics in general, and since the advent of the internet, these papers have become increasingly available) and re-reads of books and comics near and dear to my heart. But if someone recommends a new book highly enough, I'm likely to give it a whirl.


    Quote:
    Do you read less of any genre because nowadays it's readily available on the screen?


No. Just the opposite.

The books are better than the movie/television adaptation 99.9 % of the time. On the increasingly rare occasions I see a new film that I really enjoy, I always seek out the book, and that invariably becomes my 'go to' if I want to experience that story again.

In the case of Marvel/DC films and tv, it's rare that I watch them more than once. They're always a disappointment. I find the source material better in almost every respect.

But watching those films always gives me the impetus to go back to the source material. The Eternals and Shang-Chi were massive let downs, but I went straight back to the comics and re-read Kirby's Eternals and Master of Kung-Fu up to the end of the Moench/Gulacy run.

So the movies and television tend only increase the amount I read.


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The Avenger


Location: New Jersey
Member Since: Thu Dec 02, 2021



    Quote:
    I did a review of the Mysterious Island movie not long ago but I didn't read the book. In the movie it seems the survivors are not so much doing for themselves but benefitting from the mysterious stranger helping them. Is this like the book?



Emphatically not. The survivors do receive some important assistance from Nemo at one point in the story, but only after they do an enormous number of very impressive things for themselves. It sounds like the movie missed the whole point of the story.



    Quote:

    Would you say Nemo is the Tony Stark analogue?



No. The Tony Stark analogue is Cyrus Harding, an engineer.



    Quote:
    Wouldn't Robinson Crusoe be the granddaddy of island survival stories?



Yes it would. It was published 1719. The Mysterious Island was published 1875. I probably read Robinson Crusoe as a boy but I don't remember it. I would speculate that Jules Verne probably emphasized science a lot more than Daniel Defoe did. Also science was farther along in 1875 than it was in 1719.



    Quote:

    Yeah I don't know why the entire comic industry suddenly decided thought balloons should vanish all at once.



I always assumed they did that because movies don't have thought balloons, and emulating movies was all the rage. Thing is, comic books aren't movies. Nor are they prose fiction. They stand in the middle between the two, with the best attributes of each.




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Zelandoni

Moderator

Member Since: Sat May 17, 2008



    Quote:
    One more book I'd like to mention is The Celestine Prophecy by James Redfield. It came out when I was about 20 years old and it left a big impression on me then.



    Quote:

    How fictional do you consider that? Completely or only partially?


I would consider it mostly fictional. I remember there being some decent life lessons in it. Evolve, grow, don't stand still... (or at least that's what I got out of it).
But the end goal, to become so harmonious with your energy and the energy around you that your body actually becomes pure energy instead of matter... I'll take that with a large pinch of salt.
Nevertheless, I loved that book!




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bd2999 

Moderator

Member Since: Sat May 17, 2008



    Quote:
    Just as I view this board as the de facto music board for our community, I see it also as the book board.


Correct. It is the board for everything that does not already have a board dedicated to it.

A little surprised there is not one with TV and movies, although there may have been one in the past and I did not pay attention to it.


    Quote:
    Do you read prose fiction? What genres do you favor?


Sure, I am not used to calling it that but I am unrefined.

Generally, I read alot of fantasy (high fantasy, urban fantasy in particular), horror and science fiction and various combinations of those.




I came into that largely through playing D&D in high school. Sort of led to Tolkien, numerous D&D novelizations and however many sense. Oddly, one of my favorite ongoing is urban fantasy and is the Dresden Files.


    Quote:
    It funds its new issues through Kickstarter.



    Quote:
    As a boy, I was an avid sci-fi reader. Lately I've less interest in reading that genre. I satisfy my sci-fi appetite through television and movies. Back when I was a boy, this wasn't as easy to do. We didn't have an endless variety of sci-fi shows and films available on streaming services like we do today.


I read a fair bit in it still but if I am to be honest I think alot of the things I read often have sci-fi elements more than being pure sci-fi anymore.


    Quote:
    Do you read less of any genre because nowadays it's readily available on the screen?


I mean I am a major watcher of horror films in particular and I still read a fair bit in it.

I think it is hard to find good works in either medium but when I do it is special for me. Alot of mediocre and bad stuff in both movie, show and book form.

Honestly, superhero may become nearest to me for that definition. And that had more to do with me not enjoying comics as much but enjoying the movie adaptations a fair bit. I am not sure if it was growing up, having seen stories repeat or whatever.

I know there are loads of gripes from some about SJW ruining it but to me that is not it. Comics have a dropping readership for a while now and I feel like they cater to the pop up "shock" moments to try and pull in interest and are not as interested in continuing stories of x. It is more so-and-so is writing and we turned them loose to tell their story. Which is often not as compelling to me and ends up with everything being a muddled mess and uninteresting.






Look Raist bunnies...
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The Avenger


Location: New Jersey
Member Since: Thu Dec 02, 2021



    Quote:

    Way back in the day I used to read mystery/detective stories, along with science fiction. I found Ellery Queen's Mystery Magazine at a local used bookstore.



I go through phases where I read murder mysteries. This usually coincides with me frequenting the local library. I don't want to spend money on murder mysteries, but I'll read them if I can get them for free, like via the local library.



    Quote:
    I also read The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy after seeing it on my local PBS station, along with various Star Trek short stories collections.



When I belatedly became a fan of Star Trek: Deep Space Nine, I didn't want it to end with the final season, so I started reading novels set in that framework. I liked them a lot.



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The Avenger


Location: New Jersey
Member Since: Thu Dec 02, 2021



    Quote:

      Quote:
      Do you read prose fiction? What genres do you favor?


    Yes. Lots. I must have read hundreds of books in my lifetime. With lots more to come, hopefully.

    Genres? Well, I started reading through comics, but at a pretty young age I got into science fiction, horror, sword and sorcery. Basically anything with a fantastic element to it.



That was my trajectory too. First comics, then everything else. Comics, through Thor, even led me to an interest in mythology.

It was comics that made me question whether some genres needed to be kept separate in prose, since they cohabited so gracefully in Marvel and DC stories. Some of moviedom's most famous franchises were probably inspired by the unfettered imagination of comic books. Star Wars, for example, is a mash-up of sci-fi with fantasy. I'm still waiting for movies to catch up with Marvel's War of the Worlds featuring Killraven, a mash-up of sword and sorcery with sci-fi. Even prose hasn't quite gone there, although the sword and planet genre comes close, beginning with the classic Mars tales by Edgar Rice Burroughs, decades before any comic had yet been published. (The Mars stories are awesome, but they differ crucially from sword and sorcery due to the lack of a horror element, and the civilized outlook of the hero, John Carter.)



    Quote:
    Eventually I started to gravitate towards the classics, auto/biography (Especially music bios) and science.



The only literary, mainstream, non-genre author I like is Ernest Hemingway. Modern storytelling owes more to him than most people nowadays realize.



    Quote:

      Quote:
      Do you read less of any genre because nowadays it's readily available on the screen?


    No. Just the opposite.

    The books are better than the movie/television adaptation 99.9 % of the time. On the increasingly rare occasions I see a new film that I really enjoy, I always seek out the book, and that invariably becomes my 'go to' if I want to experience that story again.



I did this with the Girl with the Dragon Tattoo novels. I saw one of the movies - I don't even think it was the first - and then decided to read the novels. They were better than the film I saw. Prose just manages to go deeper than movies ever can.




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bd2999 

Moderator

Member Since: Sat May 17, 2008



    Quote:

      Quote:
      At least I can't read any more. Perhaps a lack of attention, but books, especially novels talk too much. I need my entertainment to "get to the point" and that seems to be something that "good writing" actively avoids. They want to "paint you a picture" spending paragraphs describing a desert for example.



    Quote:

    That's one reason I like sword and sorcery. As you say - it gets to the point. The sword-point, so to speak. The authors know and respect their audience, most of whom are fans of things like comic books, video games, action films, and tabletop RPGs.


Depends on the writer. Robert Jordan with Wheel of Time for instance is crazy wordy. Tolkien is wordy himself depending on the book. Not to knock either because I enjoy them. Just is variable.

I honestly like the "establishing shot" or description. It is more immersive and important for tone. Particularly with horror.





Look Raist bunnies...
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The Avenger


Location: New Jersey
Member Since: Thu Dec 02, 2021



    Quote:

      Quote:

        Quote:
        At least I can't read any more. Perhaps a lack of attention, but books, especially novels talk too much. I need my entertainment to "get to the point" and that seems to be something that "good writing" actively avoids. They want to "paint you a picture" spending paragraphs describing a desert for example.

      That's one reason I like sword and sorcery. As you say - it gets to the point. The sword-point, so to speak. The authors know and respect their audience, most of whom are fans of things like comic books, video games, action films, and tabletop RPGs.


    Depends on the writer. Robert Jordan with Wheel of Time for instance is crazy wordy. Tolkien is wordy himself depending on the book. Not to knock either because I enjoy them. Just is variable.



Wheel of Time and Lord of the Rings are not sword and sorcery. They're high fantasy. Nevertheless, I still should have been clearer in what I said. I meant modern sword and sorcery. Some of the older stuff probably did get wordy. The modern stuff, especially from the 90s onward, is geared to an audience raised on video games.

Sword and sorcery typically features Ronin-type warriors, usually barbarians, who are anti-heroic to varying extents, and generally are quite willing to rob wizards or warlords, or enlist as mercenaries, or make a living as professional assassins, and who invariably come face to face with some sort of gibbering supernatural horror of a Lovecraftian bent.



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bd2999 

Moderator

Member Since: Sat May 17, 2008



    Quote:

      Quote:

        Quote:

          Quote:
          At least I can't read any more. Perhaps a lack of attention, but books, especially novels talk too much. I need my entertainment to "get to the point" and that seems to be something that "good writing" actively avoids. They want to "paint you a picture" spending paragraphs describing a desert for example.

        That's one reason I like sword and sorcery. As you say - it gets to the point. The sword-point, so to speak. The authors know and respect their audience, most of whom are fans of things like comic books, video games, action films, and tabletop RPGs.



      Quote:
      Depends on the writer. Robert Jordan with Wheel of Time for instance is crazy wordy. Tolkien is wordy himself depending on the book. Not to knock either because I enjoy them. Just is variable.



    Quote:

    Wheel of Time and Lord of the Rings are not sword and sorcery. They're high fantasy. Nevertheless, I still should have been clearer in what I said. I meant modern sword and sorcery. Some of the older stuff probably did get wordy. The modern stuff, especially from the 90s onward, is geared to an audience raised on video games.


Quite right, no clue where my head was at on that one. More like Conan.


    Quote:
    Sword and sorcery typically features Ronin-type warriors, usually barbarians, who are anti-heroic to varying extents, and generally are quite willing to rob wizards or warlords, or enlist as mercenaries, or make a living as professional assassins, and who invariably come face to face with some sort of gibbering supernatural horror of a Lovecraftian bent.







Look Raist bunnies...
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The Avenger


Location: New Jersey
Member Since: Thu Dec 02, 2021



    Quote:
    A little surprised there is not one with TV and movies, although there may have been one in the past and I did not pay attention to it.



When I look at the menu, I see a Movies board and a Television board, and the links work. Do you not see them?



    Quote:
    Generally, I read alot of fantasy (sword and sorcery medieval fantasy, urban fantasy in particular), horror and science fiction and various combinations of those.



    Quote:
    ...I came into that largely through playing D&D in high school. Sort of led to Tolkien, numerous D&D novelizations and however many sense. Oddly, one of my favorite ongoing is urban fantasy and is the Dresden Files.



That's cool that you played D&D. I never managed to find a group where I was. At one point, like 20 years ago, I tried to get a group together, but I wasn't successful.



    Quote:
    ...I read a fair bit in it still but if I am to be honest I think alot of the things I read often have sci-fi elements more than being pure sci-fi anymore.



What would be some examples?



    Quote:
    I mean I am a major watcher of horror films in particular and I still read a fair bit in it.



Horror is unique in that it lends itself so well to movies yet also (for different reasons) lends itself really well to prose. And some of the best horror prose (Lovecraft comes to mind) is very challenging to translate to a visual medium, because the prose relies so heavily on narration.



    Quote:
    Honestly, superhero may become nearest to me for that definition. And that had more to do with me not enjoying comics as much but enjoying the movie adaptations a fair bit. I am not sure if it was growing up, having seen stories repeat or whatever.



    Quote:
    I know there are loads of gripes from some about SJW ruining it but to me that is not it. Comics have a dropping readership for a while now and I feel like they cater to the pop up "shock" moments to try and pull in interest and are not as interested in continuing stories of x. It is more so-and-so is writing and we turned them loose to tell their story. Which is often not as compelling to me and ends up with everything being a muddled mess and uninteresting.



I tend to agree with you here. The Marvel movies are immensely superior to modern Marvel comics. I would no longer be a Marvel fan at all if not for the movies. I occasionally buy a particular modern story arc because it seems unusually interesting, but mostly the only printed Marvel material I buy is from last century. But I enjoy the movies.



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bd2999 

Moderator

Member Since: Sat May 17, 2008



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      A little surprised there is not one with TV and movies, although there may have been one in the past and I did not pay attention to it.



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    When I look at the menu, I see a Movies board and a Television board, and the links work. Do you not see them?


This is a result of my poor wording. I should have worded it...

"I am surprised there is not a board for literature, as there are ones for TV and movies". My other comment is some boards come and go based on their traffic over the years. Mostly in the Second String sanctuary but it happens, so I cannot rule that out. I have been around a while though.


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      Generally, I read alot of fantasy (sword and sorcery medieval fantasy, urban fantasy in particular), horror and science fiction and various combinations of those.

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        ...I came into that largely through playing D&D in high school. Sort of led to Tolkien, numerous D&D novelizations and however many sense. Oddly, one of my favorite ongoing is urban fantasy and is the Dresden Files.



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    That's cool that you played D&D. I never managed to find a group where I was. At one point, like 20 years ago, I tried to get a group together, but I wasn't successful.


Still play sometimes. I love playing it. Heck, I like reading some of the original manuals for prior additions. The material on classic Planescape and Ravenloft in particular is pretty great IMO.


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      ...I read a fair bit in it still but if I am to be honest I think alot of the things I read often have sci-fi elements more than being pure sci-fi anymore.



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    What would be some examples?


I just finished a novel/novella called Shattered Sea's. It is sort of an Aliens meets Lovecraft. A group of marines goes to an undersea base because they stopped hearing back and it turns out they dug too deep. It is inspired by a board game called Deep Madness that is quite good as well.

Some others I could think of is the Troop. Not great but science turned tape worms into killers. One could argue about how sci-fi that is I guess. The other ones that spring to mind that fit the bill better would be the Luminous Dead and Ship of Fools.


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      I mean I am a major watcher of horror films in particular and I still read a fair bit in it.



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    Horror is unique in that it lends itself so well to movies yet also (for different reasons) lends itself really well to prose. And some of the best horror prose (Lovecraft comes to mind) is very challenging to translate to a visual medium, because the prose relies so heavily on narration.


I honestly think in some respects some of the best satire can be told through horror. As it forces the exploration of the darker sides of human nature and morality stories.

I agree with cosmic horror. The narration aspect makes it hard and so does the undescribable horror. It is hard to do that sort of thing justice when you have to show it.

Among my favorite of such films though would be the two silent films by the HP Lovecraft society called Call of Cthulhu and Whisperer in Darkness. In addition to the Thing by John Carpenter, the Void, Color Out of Space and oddly the Lucio Fulci film The Beyond. Although many of the later's works are heavily inspired.

There are a few good trailers that never were made into movies but were student films on youtube. The not horror as such film Annihilation is also very Lovecraftian to me. Two other more recent ones would be Underwater and Superdeep.


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      Honestly, superhero may become nearest to me for that definition. And that had more to do with me not enjoying comics as much but enjoying the movie adaptations a fair bit. I am not sure if it was growing up, having seen stories repeat or whatever.

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        I know there are loads of gripes from some about SJW ruining it but to me that is not it. Comics have a dropping readership for a while now and I feel like they cater to the pop up "shock" moments to try and pull in interest and are not as interested in continuing stories of x. It is more so-and-so is writing and we turned them loose to tell their story. Which is often not as compelling to me and ends up with everything being a muddled mess and uninteresting.



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    I tend to agree with you here. The Marvel movies are immensely superior to modern Marvel comics. I would no longer be a Marvel fan at all if not for the movies. I occasionally buy a particular modern story arc because it seems unusually interesting, but mostly the only printed Marvel material I buy is from last century. But I enjoy the movies.


I buy something on the rare occasion but I used to buy alot regularly.






Look Raist bunnies...
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atrimus


Location: Saint Louis, MO
Member Since: Sat May 17, 2008
Posts: 2,479



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      Outside of a few series, I tend to think stories are better told via books than TV/movies. I tend to like lending my own imagination to the story versus seeing a movie director’s interpretation. LotR is one of the few exceptions, which is to say I think it’s as good as the books, and a good companion work.



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    I also like how prose fiction can go in depth into things the movies will only briefly mention or show just a glimpse of. Often these in-depth studies are tangential to the main plots, yet nevertheless I will consider them the most meaningful parts of the stories.


Movies have potential to be better in the sense that there’s less material (i.e. filler) to muddle the plot. They also come with the added bonus of music, which if done right can offer their own flavor of depth, emotion and imagination. But generally, I prefer books. I LOVE world building, and films just come up short here compared to books. I also (oddly enough) think books are better than movies at “showing versus telling,” though this could simply be the result of my own inattentiveness. I’m more likely to retain certain narrative cues in prose, versus film, where my attention is divided between backgrounds, visual spectacle, and the aforementioned music.


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      I was heavy into books in the late 90s and early 00s, but now I don’t read as much. High fantasy is my preferred genre by a country mile: my favorite series being Wheel of Time, Tolkien-verse, The Death Gate Cycle, some of the earlier Dragonlance novels, Wayfarer Redemption, and a few others that escape me atm. I gave A Song of Fire and Ice a go way back when, but I didn’t care for it at the time; I just found descriptions of sex between Daenerys (described as 15) and Drogo to be off putting.



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    I enjoyed the original Game of Thrones novel. (Book I of A Song of Fire and Ice.) But then my interest started to wane. The decline of my absorption began with the death of Eddard Stark, who was my favorite character. Actually the Starks were the only characters I cared about at all, except for Tyrion. So when the book was focusing on other characters, it was a bit of a chore for me to keep reading. Also I wanted just a little more magic. I didn't need a ton more, but certainly more than the novels gave us.


Ned and Tyrion were my favorites in the show too, though oddly enough, I liked Ned’s death in the show, as I wasn’t expecting the subversion. Tyrion pretty much carried things for me then on, though I thought Tywin, Breanne, Varys, and the Hound-Arya duo all stole their scenes. Things seemed to change when Tyrion swore fealty to Daenerys though; at that point he stopped being the witty, clever cynic that made the character so likable. I’m fearing that the books might follow a similar trajectory, though so far I must say that Bran is a bit more interesting in the book.





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Happy Hogan 

Manager

Location: Northern Virginia
Member Since: Sat May 17, 2008
Posts: 4,441




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      Way back in the day I used to read mystery/detective stories, along with science fiction. I found Ellery Queen's Mystery Magazine at a local used bookstore.



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    I go through phases where I read murder mysteries. This usually coincides with me frequenting the local library. I don't want to spend money on murder mysteries, but I'll read them if I can get them for free, like via the local library.


It didn't have to be a MURDER mystery for me. It could be a robbery, con game, anything that needs a detective to figure out what's going on. It also doesn't have to be a police detective or private eye. The 'detective' of the story can be a teacher, a doctor, shopkeeper, student, construction worker, etc.
I'm not one to often commit to reading a lot of long novels. EQMM is a collection of short story mysteries by various authors. It was like a reading buffet for me. I could see which authors and characters were my taste. I also got them very cheap from the bookstore. (BTW, I still read more short stories than novels.)


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      I also read The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy after seeing it on my local PBS station, along with various Star Trek short stories collections.



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    When I belatedly became a fan of Star Trek: Deep Space Nine, I didn't want it to end with the final season, so I started reading novels set in that framework. I liked them a lot.


I was also sorry to see DS9 end. That setting of a space station allowed for characters that would never have worked onboard series based on a federation ship, like Quark or Garek. Those two characters would fit in very well in a mystery story.







Superman's Pal

Moderator

Member Since: Sat May 17, 2008
Posts: 5,780


I don't think there was ever a literature board but there used to be a Music Board. Unfortunately the searchable archives of shuttered boards are not available, as far as I know.



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zvelf


Member Since: Sat May 17, 2008






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    What do you like best about his stories? I can see he's won many awards.


The stories are extremely well thought-out and some tackle thorny issues about society and free will. In a word, they are about as intelligent as sci-fi gets.




How to make an entrance: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=49xWJJvpjzI
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The Avenger


Location: New Jersey
Member Since: Thu Dec 02, 2021



    Quote:
    I don't think there was ever a literature board but there used to be a Music Board. Unfortunately the searchable archives of shuttered boards are not available, as far as I know.



I'm actually glad there's no literature or music board, because if there were, I'd feel obligated to post about literature or music on those boards, instead of here. I'd rather post about them here. To me a community board should be more than just a politics board. I'm happy to talk about politics, as I've demonstrated, but I want to talk about other things too.

I don't watch a lot of sports, but if I did, I'd be posting about sports here. I would love it if other people did this. Even if I mostly just lurked on those threads, I'm pretty sure I'd enjoy them.








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