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MattS80




Len Weins Juatice League run is supposed to be classic and one of the series best, but does it still hold up? Does it feel kind of dated? What were some of his best stories? Thanks.


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Omar Karindu




> Len Weins Juatice League run is supposed to be classic and one of the series best, but does it still hold up? Does it feel kind of dated? What were some of his best stories? Thanks.

I's fun, fun run, though I must confess to enjoying the later Engelhart and Conway stuff a bit more than Wein's work.

It's not much more dated than your average 1970s superhero book. As to his best stories, I'd point to the three JLA/JSA stories he did in #100-2, 107-8, and #113. The first of those, which is the legendary story that revived the Seven Soldiers of Victory, is to my mind one of the most perfect JLA stories ever told.

I'm also quite fond of the story from #110 that introduces the Injustice Gang and Libra, which continues over into the next issue and manages to pull in Amazo as well.

- Omar Karindu

"A Renoir. I have three, myself. I had four, but ordered one burned...It displeased me." -- Doctor Doom

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TJ Burns




> > Len Weins Juatice League run is supposed to be classic and one of the series best, but does it still hold up? Does it feel kind of dated? What were some of his best stories? Thanks.
>
> I's fun, fun run, though I must confess to enjoying the later Engelhart and Conway stuff a bit more than Wein's work.

Same here... but then again, Englehart's run is my favorite JLA run at all. If he'd been on the title longer (Brad Meltzer's outwrote him already, to give you folks that haven't read Englehart's take an idea... yet we saw that run being borrowed from for the Justice League animated.) , he'd be my pick for the best JLA writer ever.

> It's not much more dated than your average 1970s superhero book. As to his best stories, I'd point to the three JLA/JSA stories he did in #100-2, 107-8, and #113. The first of those, which is the legendary story that revived the Seven Soldiers of Victory, is to my mind one of the most perfect JLA stories ever told.

Definitely my favorite JLA/JSA crossover.

> I'm also quite fond of the story from #110 that introduces the Injustice Gang and Libra, which continues over into the next issue and manages to pull in Amazo as well.

I love that arc. I still say Professor Ivo was Libra. \:\)


TJB


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JRP





> Same here... but then again, Englehart's run is my favorite JLA run at all. If he'd been on the title longer (Brad Meltzer's outwrote him already, to give you folks that haven't read Englehart's take an idea... yet we saw that run being borrowed from for the Justice League animated.) , he'd be my pick for the best JLA writer ever.

I would be interested in reading that.


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Scott




Steve Englehart wrote JUSTICE LEAGUE OF AMERICA #139-#146 and #149-159.

Scott


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Gernot




Now, HE is probably my favorite JLA writer of all time, except for perhaps Gardner Fox (and HIS strong point was in plot, NOT characterization!).

As for Len Wein, wasn't he the one who also brought back The Shaggy Man in one of the early 100's? I think that's my favorite tale. Everyone had a good chance to shine, and did! \:\)

Gernot...

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