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Jonathan




I'm asking here because I asked elsewhere and got responses that amused the authors but did not, except in one case, answer the question.

You guys either answer the question or say nothing.

Is Superboy back from the dead yet?

I have read only the first 2 volumes of 52 with a slightly batty Wonder Girl convinced that Nova is Conner Kent or whatever.

I'm eager to see him back. I hope to see him still in the t-shirt and jeans.


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katefan




> I'm asking here because I asked elsewhere and got responses that amused the authors but did not, except in one case, answer the question.
>
> You guys either answer the question or say nothing.
>
> Is Superboy back from the dead yet?
>
> I have read only the first 2 volumes of 52 with a slightly batty Wonder Girl convinced that Nova is Conner Kent or whatever.
>
> I'm eager to see him back. I hope to see him still in the t-shirt and jeans.

First of all, I find it sad that the word "yet" was used in your sentence. Not that you were wrong to do so, but that death has become such a joke in the Marvel and DC universes that it is not a matter of "if" a character will come back more as "when".

As for "when" Superboy will return; no, he isn't back yet. In Teen Titans, Robin was attempting to clone Connor and failed, and he and Wonder Girl seemed to come to terms with his demise.

Personally, I think he should stay dead. All characters should stay dead. Make death mean something again and whenever a writer is thinking of killing someone off, make it a huge deal rather than the revolving door it has become.


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Gernot




> I'm asking here because I asked elsewhere and got responses that amused the authors but did not, except in one case, answer the question.
>
> You guys either answer the question or say nothing.
>
> Is Superboy back from the dead yet?
>
> I have read only the first 2 volumes of 52 with a slightly batty Wonder Girl convinced that Nova is Conner Kent or whatever.
>
> I'm eager to see him back. I hope to see him still in the t-shirt and jeans.

Superboy won't return until the lawsuit is settle, if even then.

Gernot...

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Jonathan




I don't want death in comic books. There's plenty of it in real life.

I go to comics to escape. When I was a kid I got comic books to escape my abusive parents.

So did most of my siblings. Some of my sisters are DID/MPD (google it) because of what family members did to them.

I was simply angry and hateful until I escaped.

I lived in comic books and tv.

I've treasured Captain America because he has been the person everyone ought to be if they had those powers. Or even without them.

Superman is much like that, though the writers need to realize that a person with that build who is merely human is not going to be subdued by any 4 or 5 people. Losing super powers does not make Clark Kent into Jimmy Olsen.

If I had been reading comic books when Superman was killed by Doomsday, I would have been very upset. As it was, I just thought it was a great marketing ploy. And it would be an even bigger sales boost when they brought him back to life.

I don't care to see the nasty things in comic books that I see in life. I'd be just as glad to see the Joker killed. I don't want my heroes killed.

I'm fairly pissed about Marvel "killing" Cap. Bring him back and have done.

Jean Gray is the joke. I never know whether she's alive or dead at any given time.

> > I'm asking here because I asked elsewhere and got responses that amused the authors but did not, except in one case, answer the question.
> >
> > You guys either answer the question or say nothing.
> >
> > Is Superboy back from the dead yet?
> >
> > I have read only the first 2 volumes of 52 with a slightly batty Wonder Girl convinced that Nova is Conner Kent or whatever.
> >
> > I'm eager to see him back. I hope to see him still in the t-shirt and jeans.
>
> First of all, I find it sad that the word "yet" was used in your sentence. Not that you were wrong to do so, but that death has become such a joke in the Marvel and DC universes that it is not a matter of "if" a character will come back more as "when".
>
> As for "when" Superboy will return; no, he isn't back yet. In Teen Titans, Robin was attempting to clone Connor and failed, and he and Wonder Girl seemed to come to terms with his demise.
>
> Personally, I think he should stay dead. All characters should stay dead. Make death mean something again and whenever a writer is thinking of killing someone off, make it a huge deal rather than the revolving door it has become.


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katefan




I agree with a lot of what you have to say, although I do think death does have a place in comics where heroes are concerned. I just don't think that it should be done lightly as it has been for the past twenty years, since Jean Grey's (first) return. :/


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ShdwGunslingerX




I so agree with you. Death is meaningless in the comics because they never have the fortitude to let them stay dead. What good is dying if you know they will be back in 6 months to a year? Very sad...


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Jonathan




> I so agree with you. Death is meaningless in the comics because they never have the fortitude to let them stay dead. What good is dying if you know they will be back in 6 months to a year? Very sad...

The answer is that the death of super heroes in comic books is NOT good.

If you enjoy death, turn on the news.


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Smithville Thunderbolt




> The answer is that the death of super heroes in comic books is NOT good.
>
> If you enjoy death, turn on the news.

What about deaths in other media? Do you think that movies or novels shouldn't portray death?


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Jonathan




> > The answer is that the death of super heroes in comic books is NOT good.
> >
> > If you enjoy death, turn on the news.
>
> What about deaths in other media? Do you think that movies or novels shouldn't portray death?

A movie or novel that is a one-shot-deal will do what it does when it is fiction. I avoid fiction that kills someone. I have not read an Andrew Vachss novel since he killed the dog.

I did not appreciate Clancy's movie killing James Earl Jones.

But both of these are intended to be realistic.

Comic books are not.

I find out if something bad happens before I pick up a book or watch a movie. I do that because I avoid being wounded. I don't need an extra trigger to start a depressive episode or a panic attack.

Am I taking it all too seriously? Of course. It is part of my mental illness. I can't be a different way. If I could, I would not be taking pills and seeing a psychiatrist.

Comic books are not novels or movies. I'd like to have one safe place.

And Harry Potter, as yet, has not allowed anyone new to die. Dumbledore didn't die, he simply became a faceless, nameless actor who is not making us forget Richard Harris. I wonder if they made any attempt to get Ian McLellan or someone else who could actually bring something to the role.


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Smithville Thunderbolt




> But both of these are intended to be realistic.
>
> Comic books are not.

Well, the reality is that the creators today are trying for a realistic approach (though sometimes to a fault I think). Many creators today are novelists and screenwriters, and they apply the same methods to their comic writing as they do to their other work.

> Comic books are not novels or movies. I'd like to have one safe place.

That's certainly understandable, and my suggestion is the get the DC books based on the animated properties. There is certainly no shortage of them. Over on the Marvel side, I highly recommend the Marvel Adventures line. You'll get good stories without death or excessive violence. And of course, there is always Silver Age collections.



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Nova





No thanks. I like Kon and want him back. Close the door once he gets back.

> > I'm asking here because I asked elsewhere and got responses that amused the authors but did not, except in one case, answer the question.
> >
> > You guys either answer the question or say nothing.
> >
> > Is Superboy back from the dead yet?
> >
> > I have read only the first 2 volumes of 52 with a slightly batty Wonder Girl convinced that Nova is Conner Kent or whatever.
> >
> > I'm eager to see him back. I hope to see him still in the t-shirt and jeans.
>
> First of all, I find it sad that the word "yet" was used in your sentence. Not that you were wrong to do so, but that death has become such a joke in the Marvel and DC universes that it is not a matter of "if" a character will come back more as "when".
>
> As for "when" Superboy will return; no, he isn't back yet. In Teen Titans, Robin was attempting to clone Connor and failed, and he and Wonder Girl seemed to come to terms with his demise.
>
> Personally, I think he should stay dead. All characters should stay dead. Make death mean something again and whenever a writer is thinking of killing someone off, make it a huge deal rather than the revolving door it has become.


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King Zeal




> > But both of these are intended to be realistic.
> >
> > Comic books are not.
>
> Well, the reality is that the creators today are trying for a realistic approach (though sometimes to a fault I think). Many creators today are novelists and screenwriters, and they apply the same methods to their comic writing as they do to their other work.
>
> > Comic books are not novels or movies. I'd like to have one safe place.
>
> That's certainly understandable, and my suggestion is the get the DC books based on the animated properties. There is certainly no shortage of them. Over on the Marvel side, I highly recommend the Marvel Adventures line. You'll get good stories without death or excessive violence. And of course, there is always Silver Age collections.
>

I have different reason for hating death in comics. Right now, I happen to have the misfortune of having my favorite DC character (Kon-El) and my favorite Marvel character (Steve Rogers) dead. These are two characters that I have spent years of my life reading, and still find myself enjoying their adventures, even if the writing isn't great all the time.

I personally find it insulting when a character gets killed because "there's no more stories to tell". That's ridiculous. Hal Jordan just took part in a wonderful storyline. (Sinestro Corps War) The X-Men just renewed interest in their exploits with "Messiah Complex", and Kurt Busiek's Superman is an enjoyable read. The idea that the characters have no more stories is utterly stupid. It's the writers who don't have anymore stories.

Death in comics is a curse. For example, even if a writer came up with a good story to tell about Kon-El, he can't. If DC doesn't keep him dead for a while, his sacrifice meant nothing. And when they do bring him back, they have to spend time explaining his return rather than just telling the story. And since everyone knows that comic book death is seldom permanent, what's the point in dramatically killing off a character anymore?


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Jonathan




I want to be safe, but I am not in 2nd grade.;)


> > > But both of these are intended to be realistic.
> > >
> > > Comic books are not.
> >
> > Well, the reality is that the creators today are trying for a realistic approach (though sometimes to a fault I think). Many creators today are novelists and screenwriters, and they apply the same methods to their comic writing as they do to their other work.
> >
> > > Comic books are not novels or movies. I'd like to have one safe place.
> >
> > That's certainly understandable, and my suggestion is the get the DC books based on the animated properties. There is certainly no shortage of them. Over on the Marvel side, I highly recommend the Marvel Adventures line. You'll get good stories without death or excessive violence. And of course, there is always Silver Age collections.
> >
>
> I have different reason for hating death in comics. Right now, I happen to have the misfortune of having my favorite DC character (Kon-El) and my favorite Marvel character (Steve Rogers) dead. These are two characters that I have spent years of my life reading, and still find myself enjoying their adventures, even if the writing isn't great all the time.
>
> I personally find it insulting when a character gets killed because "there's no more stories to tell". That's ridiculous. Hal Jordan just took part in a wonderful storyline. (Sinestro Corps War) The X-Men just renewed interest in their exploits with "Messiah Complex", and Kurt Busiek's Superman is an enjoyable read. The idea that the characters have no more stories is utterly stupid. It's the writers who don't have anymore stories.
>
> Death in comics is a curse. For example, even if a writer came up with a good story to tell about Kon-El, he can't. If DC doesn't keep him dead for a while, his sacrifice meant nothing. And when they do bring him back, they have to spend time explaining his return rather than just telling the story. And since everyone knows that comic book death is seldom permanent, what's the point in dramatically killing off a character anymore?


Posted with Mozilla Firefox 2.0.0.12 on Windows XP

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