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ClayFaceCopyCat




Dont get me wrong, I have nothing but respect for the golden age wildcat. He was a boxer, using his fighting abilities against crime.But I forgot who it was excatly but I remember that the whole JSA was given some extra strength and vitality by a super villin. But then extant took all that away and aged the jsa back to normal in zero hour right? Ok, not green lanter, flash I can see them being able to fight in the jsa because of their super powers. but if wildcat is just a regular 60yr old guy right? Even if he is in the best possible shape of a senior citizen, isnt he a lil old to be putting on the suit? If therse something Im missing here clue me in.


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Ed Love


Location: North Carolina
Member Since: Sat May 17, 2008
Posts: 835


> Dont get me wrong, I have nothing but respect for the golden age wildcat. He was a boxer, using his fighting abilities against crime.But I forgot who it was excatly but I remember that the whole JSA was given some extra strength and vitality by a super villin. But then extant took all that away and aged the jsa back to normal in zero hour right? Ok, not green lanter, flash I can see them being able to fight in the jsa because of their super powers. but if wildcat is just a regular 60yr old guy right? Even if he is in the best possible shape of a senior citizen, isnt he a lil old to be putting on the suit? If therse something Im missing here clue me in.

He was given 9 lives to explain why he keeps defaulting about being just slightly past his prime. Just as it has been suggested the Speed Force and Alan's ring allowed the Flash, Johnny Quick and Green Lantern to bounce back (not sure what explanation there is for Hourman though, other than something that Hourman III may have done).





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Ohotmu the all-knowing




> He was given 9 lives to explain why he keeps defaulting about being just slightly past his prime. Just as it has been suggested the Speed Force and Alan's ring allowed the Flash, Johnny Quick and Green Lantern to bounce back (not sure what explanation there is for Hourman though, other than something that Hourman III may have done).
>

Footnote:
He's just a regular Joe now as his 9 lives have expired. In a JSA Classified story, the Dragon King had same magical implement that Hitler had to prevent the supers from getting involved in WW2 (the Spear of Destiny, IIRC). He had captured Flash and Wildcat to hold them captive until he collected the rest of the JSA, at which point he would amuse himself by watching as he commanded them to kill one another.

They were caught in a circle where they still had their wits. They were told that if they crossed the boundary of the circle, they would be induced to kill each other, regardless of whether the Dragon King was present to order it.

Wildcat figured that the spear only had influence on supers. The only reason he was super was because he still had some of his 9 lives. He wasn't sure how many he had left because the Crimson Avenger blew him away quite a few times in a JSA storyarc.

Anyway, he convinced a reluctant Flash to stop his heart to kill him so he'd use up his remaining life (he was pretty sure he still had one more). The reasoning was that once this was done, he would no longer be super and no longer be subject to the Spear.

Flash did it. He revived. The plan worked. The good guys won.

To the best of my knowledge, he has not been shown to have any more lives stocked up.


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Sweep Secondhand




The spear of destiny was originally supposed to only effect heroes who were vulnerable to magic or had magic based powers. This prevented characters like Superman and the Spectre from going into Germany during the war. In both origins of the JSA (pre and post Crisis), members like the Flash were shown in Germany and were not effected by the spear's power. The whole story with the Dragon King was nothing more than a badly written attempt to de-power Wildcat. It is unlikely that even if the spear was effecting "supers" at this point that Wildcat would be bothered by it. His nine lives were the bi-product of a curse placed on him by a demon that turned him into a cat. Zatara managed to reverse the curse but the nine lives stayed. The "powers" he derived from magic only kicked in when he died, they weren't part of his everyday actions. Even after Wildcat's lives were used up in the story, Flash still left the circle and reasoned he would not fall under the spear's power if he acted quickly enough. Again, just another weak story with a singular purpose in mind.





> > He was given 9 lives to explain why he keeps defaulting about being just slightly past his prime. Just as it has been suggested the Speed Force and Alan's ring allowed the Flash, Johnny Quick and Green Lantern to bounce back (not sure what explanation there is for Hourman though, other than something that Hourman III may have done).
> >
>
> Footnote:
> He's just a regular Joe now as his 9 lives have expired. In a JSA Classified story, the Dragon King had same magical implement that Hitler had to prevent the supers from getting involved in WW2 (the Spear of Destiny, IIRC). He had captured Flash and Wildcat to hold them captive until he collected the rest of the JSA, at which point he would amuse himself by watching as he commanded them to kill one another.
>
> They were caught in a circle where they still had their wits. They were told that if they crossed the boundary of the circle, they would be induced to kill each other, regardless of whether the Dragon King was present to order it.
>
> Wildcat figured that the spear only had influence on supers. The only reason he was super was because he still had some of his 9 lives. He wasn't sure how many he had left because the Crimson Avenger blew him away quite a few times in a JSA storyarc.
>
> Anyway, he convinced a reluctant Flash to stop his heart to kill him so he'd use up his remaining life (he was pretty sure he still had one more). The reasoning was that once this was done, he would no longer be super and no longer be subject to the Spear.
>
> Flash did it. He revived. The plan worked. The good guys won.
>
> To the best of my knowledge, he has not been shown to have any more lives stocked up.



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Ohotmu the all-knowing




> ...It is unlikely that even if the spear was effecting "supers" at this point that Wildcat would be bothered by it. His nine lives were the bi-product of a curse placed on him by a demon that turned him into a cat...The "powers" he derived from magic only kicked in when he died, they weren't part of his everyday actions.

Hmm, I know that I'm splitting hairs here, but here I go anyway.

Sure, Wildcat's "super" power has a very limited scope that only kicks in during very specific circumstances, but it's still a magical super power. One might think that it must be active all the time in order to kick in when needed, theoretically.

To say he was NOT magically powered when non dead is kinda like saying Dr. Strange's amulet of Agamotto is NOT magical unless it's being used or saying Wolverine is NOT a mutant when he's not actively using his healing factor or animal senses. (Sorry for all the Marvel references there.)

Like I said: "splitting hairs". I obviously have some higher regard for the story than you did, and that's fine.

However, I'm pretty sure that in the "JSA: Golden Age" miniseries, they characterized the Spear of Destiny as doing its thing versus all supers. While I realize that "Golden Age" was an Elseworlds thing, perhaps that's the reference the writers used to define the scope of the spear's influence.

Also, it's possible that some goober who is literally a walking lizard had access to some arcane powers that allowed him to expand its scope more than some Syphilitic Austrian with a goofy mustache and Napolean complex could manage. \:\-\)

Ohotmu


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Ed Love


Location: North Carolina
Member Since: Sat May 17, 2008
Posts: 835


> However, I'm pretty sure that in the "JSA: Golden Age" miniseries, they characterized the Spear of Destiny as doing its thing versus all supers. While I realize that "Golden Age" was an Elseworlds thing, perhaps that's the reference the writers used to define the scope of the spear's influence.
>
> Also, it's possible that some goober who is literally a walking lizard had access to some arcane powers that allowed him to expand its scope more than some Syphilitic Austrian with a goofy mustache and Napolean complex could manage. \:\-\)
>
Didn't really care for the Dragon King to actually be reptillian in nature. Liked him better as a masked-world conqueror type, no different really than Fu Manchu, Per Degaton, Vandal Savage, etc.

The Spear also affected more than just magical types, it went after those with magical vulnerabilities, such as Superman (apparently, the Earth-2 Superman was especially vulnerable to magic, not just as vulnerable as the next guy). Of course, that seems a bit contradictory. One would expect that magic types would have a stronger defense against magic, not less. If it affects Superman because he's MORE vulnerable, then the magic types should be LESS vulnerable to the Spear or vice versa.

It's been awhile since I read it, somehow Hawkman was not affected even though he's a reincarnate, but his wings were a by-product of lost science and not magic. While Alan Scott was affected who was a completely ordinary man whose power existed solely in an artifact. Why it would turn his mind and not just make the ring unresponsive to his commands...?

THE GOLDEN AGE however posits that the Spear wasn't that big of a deal really, that they could work around that as there were plenty of non-magic based heroes incredibly powerful in their own right: Hourman, Flash, Johnny Quick, the Ray, Human Bomb, etc. It was the German Parsifal whose power was that he nulled superpowers that kept the powered humans at bay out of fear what the loss of a mysteryman would do to morale and not the Spear (an early example of Robinson's penchant for retconning Roy Thomas retcons in favor of his own version). The story does kind of demand it, for THE GOLDEN AGE is written without there being a Superman or Wonder Woman. Likewise the JSA mystics are absent: Dr. Fate, the Spectre. I don't recall if Uncle Sam, Zatarra or Sargon appeared in the big battle or not, though the Gay Ghost was there. Meanwhile characters like Captain Triumph and Green Lantern have turned their backs on their magic while Johnny Thunder is played up as a complete dupe and moron. Magic is downplayed if not completely ignored without reference. Thus the necessity of the Spear is lessened, the biggest characters it would have worked against are absent, the only notable two with immense power are the idiot Johnny Thunder and Green Lantern.




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Ed Love


Location: North Carolina
Member Since: Sat May 17, 2008
Posts: 835


> The spear of destiny was originally supposed to only effect heroes who were vulnerable to magic or had magic based powers. This prevented characters like Superman and the Spectre from going into Germany during the war. In both origins of the JSA (pre and post Crisis), members like the Flash were shown in Germany and were not effected by the spear's power. The whole story with the Dragon King was nothing more than a badly written attempt to de-power Wildcat. It is unlikely that even if the spear was effecting "supers" at this point that Wildcat would be bothered by it. His nine lives were the bi-product of a curse placed on him by a demon that turned him into a cat. Zatara managed to reverse the curse but the nine lives stayed. The "powers" he derived from magic only kicked in when he died, they weren't part of his everyday actions. Even after Wildcat's lives were used up in the story, Flash still left the circle and reasoned he would not fall under the spear's power if he acted quickly enough. Again, just another weak story with a singular purpose in mind.

I can forgive the story that as I found the 9-Lives aspect to be a bad retcon. Although, it's a bit of overkill as we already had the horrible Crimson Avenger storyline that killed him over and over, so that it was ambiguous whether he had an extra life left or not. Why not just leave it at that?




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Sweep Secondhand




The Golden Age was a great story but, since it was clearly Elseworlds, writer should not be using it for information pretaining to the main DC universe. Wildcat's 9 lives was actually a perfect example of what a retcon SHOULD be. It fits completely seemlessly with his original appearances. Regardless of anyone's opinions of that attribute of the charatcer though, that JSA storyline was just sloppy writing. Maybe then can use other sloppy writing like the "Superboy Prime Punches" to nullify this sloppy writing. Two wrongs could potentially make a right.

- Sweep


> > However, I'm pretty sure that in the "JSA: Golden Age" miniseries, they characterized the Spear of Destiny as doing its thing versus all supers. While I realize that "Golden Age" was an Elseworlds thing, perhaps that's the reference the writers used to define the scope of the spear's influence.
> >
> > Also, it's possible that some goober who is literally a walking lizard had access to some arcane powers that allowed him to expand its scope more than some Syphilitic Austrian with a goofy mustache and Napolean complex could manage. \:\-\)
> >
> Didn't really care for the Dragon King to actually be reptillian in nature. Liked him better as a masked-world conqueror type, no different really than Fu Manchu, Per Degaton, Vandal Savage, etc.
>
> The Spear also affected more than just magical types, it went after those with magical vulnerabilities, such as Superman (apparently, the Earth-2 Superman was especially vulnerable to magic, not just as vulnerable as the next guy). Of course, that seems a bit contradictory. One would expect that magic types would have a stronger defense against magic, not less. If it affects Superman because he's MORE vulnerable, then the magic types should be LESS vulnerable to the Spear or vice versa.
>
> It's been awhile since I read it, somehow Hawkman was not affected even though he's a reincarnate, but his wings were a by-product of lost science and not magic. While Alan Scott was affected who was a completely ordinary man whose power existed solely in an artifact. Why it would turn his mind and not just make the ring unresponsive to his commands...?
>
> THE GOLDEN AGE however posits that the Spear wasn't that big of a deal really, that they could work around that as there were plenty of non-magic based heroes incredibly powerful in their own right: Hourman, Flash, Johnny Quick, the Ray, Human Bomb, etc. It was the German Parsifal whose power was that he nulled superpowers that kept the powered humans at bay out of fear what the loss of a mysteryman would do to morale and not the Spear (an early example of Robinson's penchant for retconning Roy Thomas retcons in favor of his own version). The story does kind of demand it, for THE GOLDEN AGE is written without there being a Superman or Wonder Woman. Likewise the JSA mystics are absent: Dr. Fate, the Spectre. I don't recall if Uncle Sam, Zatarra or Sargon appeared in the big battle or not, though the Gay Ghost was there. Meanwhile characters like Captain Triumph and Green Lantern have turned their backs on their magic while Johnny Thunder is played up as a complete dupe and moron. Magic is downplayed if not completely ignored without reference. Thus the necessity of the Spear is lessened, the biggest characters it would have worked against are absent, the only notable two with immense power are the idiot Johnny Thunder and Green Lantern.



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Ed Love


Location: North Carolina
Member Since: Sat May 17, 2008
Posts: 835


> The Golden Age was a great story but, since it was clearly Elseworlds, writer should not be using it for information pretaining to the main DC universe. Wildcat's 9 lives was actually a perfect example of what a retcon SHOULD be. It fits completely seemlessly with his original appearances. Regardless of anyone's opinions of that attribute of the charatcer though, that JSA storyline was just sloppy writing. Maybe then can use other sloppy writing like the "Superboy Prime Punches" to nullify this sloppy writing. Two wrongs could potentially make a right.

I disagree about it being a good retcon. While it factually fits in with his original appearances, it violates the spirit of the character ie that he has no powers and having 9 lives is definitely a superpower albeit a rather passive one. It changes a basic understanding of the character. Wildcat hanging around the JSA and fighting criminals with nothing other than his wits and fists loses a certain amount of integrity and sense of courageousness when you know that he knows that whatever happens to him, he'll bounce back as good as new. And, it wasn't a needed retcon as it doesn't explain anything.




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Sweep Secondhand




You bring up a good point about the courage factor Ed. Unfortuantely, after the whole thing with Extant removing their ability to age slower than the world around them (which is kind of a magic based super power if you think about it, there was no logical explanation for why Wildcat was still able to function. The nine lives thing made him a perpetual bad ass for the foreseeable future so I was willing to go with it. I am personally very generous towards anything that keeps Golden Age heroes in the picture. I thought the idea of merging Johnny Thunder with the Thunderbolt was brilliant but then nothing was done with it. I was dying for a scene with Alan, Jay, Ted, and Johnny Thunderbolt sitting around a table playing poker and talking about the old days but it never happened.

- Sweep




> > The Golden Age was a great story but, since it was clearly Elseworlds, writer should not be using it for information pretaining to the main DC universe. Wildcat's 9 lives was actually a perfect example of what a retcon SHOULD be. It fits completely seemlessly with his original appearances. Regardless of anyone's opinions of that attribute of the charatcer though, that JSA storyline was just sloppy writing. Maybe then can use other sloppy writing like the "Superboy Prime Punches" to nullify this sloppy writing. Two wrongs could potentially make a right.
>
> I disagree about it being a good retcon. While it factually fits in with his original appearances, it violates the spirit of the character ie that he has no powers and having 9 lives is definitely a superpower albeit a rather passive one. It changes a basic understanding of the character. Wildcat hanging around the JSA and fighting criminals with nothing other than his wits and fists loses a certain amount of integrity and sense of courageousness when you know that he knows that whatever happens to him, he'll bounce back as good as new. And, it wasn't a needed retcon as it doesn't explain anything.



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Ohotmu the all-knowing




> > However, I'm pretty sure that in the "JSA: Golden Age" miniseries, they characterized the Spear of Destiny as doing its thing versus all supers. While I realize that "Golden Age" was an Elseworlds thing, perhaps that's the reference the writers used to define the scope of the spear's influence.
> >
> > Also, it's possible that some goober who is literally a walking lizard had access to some arcane powers that allowed him to expand its scope more than some Syphilitic Austrian with a goofy mustache and Napolean complex could manage. \:\-\)
> >
> Didn't really care for the Dragon King to actually be reptillian in nature. Liked him better as a masked-world conqueror type, no different really than Fu Manchu, Per Degaton, Vandal Savage, etc.
>
> The Spear also affected more than just magical types, it went after those with magical vulnerabilities, such as Superman (apparently, the Earth-2 Superman was especially vulnerable to magic, not just as vulnerable as the next guy). Of course, that seems a bit contradictory. One would expect that magic types would have a stronger defense against magic, not less. If it affects Superman because he's MORE vulnerable, then the magic types should be LESS vulnerable to the Spear or vice versa.
>
> It's been awhile since I read it, somehow Hawkman was not affected even though he's a reincarnate, but his wings were a by-product of lost science and not magic. While Alan Scott was affected who was a completely ordinary man whose power existed solely in an artifact. Why it would turn his mind and not just make the ring unresponsive to his commands...?
>
> THE GOLDEN AGE however posits that the Spear wasn't that big of a deal really, that they could work around that as there were plenty of non-magic based heroes incredibly powerful in their own right: Hourman, Flash, Johnny Quick, the Ray, Human Bomb, etc. It was the German Parsifal whose power was that he nulled superpowers that kept the powered humans at bay out of fear what the loss of a mysteryman would do to morale and not the Spear (an early example of Robinson's penchant for retconning Roy Thomas retcons in favor of his own version). The story does kind of demand it, for THE GOLDEN AGE is written without there being a Superman or Wonder Woman. Likewise the JSA mystics are absent: Dr. Fate, the Spectre. I don't recall if Uncle Sam, Zatarra or Sargon appeared in the big battle or not, though the Gay Ghost was there. Meanwhile characters like Captain Triumph and Green Lantern have turned their backs on their magic while Johnny Thunder is played up as a complete dupe and moron. Magic is downplayed if not completely ignored without reference. Thus the necessity of the Spear is lessened, the biggest characters it would have worked against are absent, the only notable two with immense power are the idiot Johnny Thunder and Green Lantern.



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CI




> You bring up a good point about the courage factor Ed. Unfortuantely, after the whole thing with Extant removing their ability to age slower than the world around them (which is kind of a magic based super power if you think about it, there was no logical explanation for why Wildcat was still able to function. The nine lives thing made him a perpetual bad ass for the foreseeable future so I was willing to go with it. I am personally very generous towards anything that keeps Golden Age heroes in the picture.

Totally agree. Ted is of my favorite heroes and if this retcon helps explain him to be around a few more decades, I'm game. I'm actually concerned now that he has no lives left!

I thought the idea of merging Johnny Thunder with the Thunderbolt was brilliant but then nothing was done with it. I was dying for a scene with Alan, Jay, Ted, and Johnny Thunderbolt sitting around a table playing poker and talking about the old days but it never happened.
>
> - Sweep
>
Good Point! Why was the whole Johnny Thunderbolt thing dropped? Has this ever been explained.

CI
- maybe Willingham can bring this back?


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Superman's Pal

Moderator

Member Since: Sat May 17, 2008
Posts: 3,747


Since he debuted in the 1940s I'd say he has to be at least 80 by now, probably closer to 85. I think the added vitality granted in the Ian Karkull storyline is all that's needed to explain the aging. If his aging was slowed in his 20s until just a few years ago (Zero Hour probably happened "5 years ago" in DC time) he may still be a man physically of 40-50, who knows. I don't know if he really became his true age after that or if he just started aging again at a regular rate but is still at that younger age.

I thought the 9 lives retcon was basically to establish how he was healed after Crisis on Infinite Earths when his legs were "shattered" by lightning and we were told he would never walk again. I didn't think the 9 lives curse had much to do with his retarded aging but maybe it was a catch-all explanation. After all, the rest of the JSA all had fall-back explanations for their retarded aging after they lost their Karkull juice. Hawkman's aging was slowed by Nth metal, Alan Scott's by the Starheart, Jay Garrick's by the Speed Force. Why not Wildcat's by a magical curse?




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Ed Love





    Quote:
    Since he debuted in the 1940s I'd say he has to be at least 80 by now, probably closer to 85. I think the added vitality granted in the Ian Karkull storyline is all that's needed to explain the aging. If his aging was slowed in his 20s until just a few years ago (Zero Hour probably happened "5 years ago" in DC time) he may still be a man physically of 40-50, who knows. I don't know if he really became his true age after that or if he just started aging again at a regular rate but is still at that younger age.

    I thought the 9 lives retcon was basically to establish how he was healed after Crisis on Infinite Earths when his legs were "shattered" by lightning and we were told he would never walk again. I didn't think the 9 lives curse had much to do with his retarded aging but maybe it was a catch-all explanation. After all, the rest of the JSA all had fall-back explanations for their retarded aging after they lost their Karkull juice. Hawkman's aging was slowed by Nth metal, Alan Scott's by the Starheart, Jay Garrick's by the Speed Force. Why not Wildcat's by a magical curse?



A few corrections. Neither Wildcat nor Mr. Terrific were present for the Ian Karkull story that granted the majority of the JSA slow aging. There has never been a story that actually addresses them not aging. Even the nine-lives doesn't unless we accept that he's been killed a couple of times and reverted back to the 40-ish adventurer over the decades.

Nor does the 9 lives explain his healed legs. His legs were healed when he went to Valhalla with the JSA and merged with the Norse gods to fight Ragnarok. When the JSA came back from that, he retained the use of his legs. THAT storyline does explain how the JSA from that point on were younger looking than they should be and even younger physically, but it was to different degrees for the various heroes. One of Al Pratt's concerns was that they had no way of knowing if it would last, if at any time they'd start aging again or that Wildcat would lose the use of his legs.


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Superman's Pal

Moderator

Member Since: Sat May 17, 2008
Posts: 3,747


> A few corrections. Neither Wildcat nor Mr. Terrific were present for the Ian Karkull story that granted the majority of the JSA slow aging.

Not in the original telling. I'm curious, for some reason I thought the story had been retold Post-COIE with an altered cast, and for some reason I had convinced myself Wildcat had been a part of it. That misconception may have come from a conversation with my brother (as many of my misconceptions do). Has the original story been retold with a Post-COIE cast? Remember the original story had Earth-2's Superman, Lois Lane, Batman, Robin, and Catwoman who would all be absent from a Post-COIE telling. Someone likely would have taken their places to defeat Karkull's henchmen.

> Nor does the 9 lives explain his healed legs. His legs were healed when he went to Valhalla with the JSA and merged with the Norse gods to fight Ragnarok. When the JSA came back from that, he retained the use of his legs. THAT storyline does explain how the JSA from that point on were younger looking than they should be and even younger physically, but it was to different degrees for the various heroes. One of Al Pratt's concerns was that they had no way of knowing if it would last, if at any time they'd start aging again or that Wildcat would lose the use of his legs.

Ah yes, I did remember the Valhalla thing after I had posted originally. Where did Pratt express those concerns, was it that short-lived early '90s JSA ongoing after Armageddon Inferno? I only ever read a couple issues of that.



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Ed Love


Location: North Carolina
Member Since: Sat May 17, 2008
Posts: 835



    Quote:
    > A few corrections. Neither Wildcat nor Mr. Terrific were present for the Ian Karkull story that granted the majority of the JSA slow aging.

    Not in the original telling. I'm curious, for some reason I thought the story had been retold Post-COIE with an altered cast, and for some reason I had convinced myself Wildcat had been a part of it. That misconception may have come from a conversation with my brother (as many of my misconceptions do). Has the original story been retold with a Post-COIE cast? Remember the original story had Earth-2's Superman, Lois Lane, Batman, Robin, and Catwoman who would all be absent from a Post-COIE telling. Someone likely would have taken their places to defeat Karkull's henchmen.


Well, without Catwoman, there'd have to have been a different villain too for a henchman. As far as I know, there was never an official retelling (as there was for the origin of the JSA). I like the Ian Karkull story, it's an elegant and entertaining story in its own right while at the same time explaining various continuity issues (the coming and going of a couple members, why they and their significant others didn't age as quickly quickly), a good way to do a retcon.


    Quote:
    Ah yes, I did remember the Valhalla thing after I had posted originally. Where did Pratt express those concerns, was it that short-lived early '90s JSA ongoing after Armageddon Inferno? I only ever read a couple issues of that.

Yep, the Parobeck series. While a little light-hearted, I enjoyed that series a lot and would have loved to see where they would have gone in the second year as they went slow to organically bring the team all back together. I liked Kiku a whole lot better than Jakeem as a new person to command the Thunderbolt, while at the same time keeping Johnny.




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DavidS





    Quote:

      Quote:
      > A few corrections. Neither Wildcat nor Mr. Terrific were present for the Ian Karkull story that granted the majority of the JSA slow aging.

      Not in the original telling. I'm curious, for some reason I thought the story had been retold Post-COIE with an altered cast


    Sort of. The Darkness Falls storyline in JSA 7-9 did a one-panel flashback that inserted Dr Mid-Nite into the story (he wasn't there in the original tale either). But still no Wildcat or Mr Terrific.

    I've been reading up on JSA history recently. I understand that, prior to his multiple shootings by the Crimson Avenger, he had only lost two lives - Once, on panel, in Crisis Times 5 (JLA 28-31) and off panel sometime in the 1960s fighting Solomon Grundy (can't remember the source for that).


      Quote:

      Yep, the Parobeck series. While a little light-hearted, I enjoyed that series a lot and would have loved to see where they would have gone in the second year as they went slow to organically bring the team all back together. I liked Kiku a whole lot better than Jakeem as a new person to command the Thunderbolt, while at the same time keeping Johnny.


    I really wish we'd seen more of Kiku. I'm sad to say that the only way we'd see her now is if she became a villain, challenging Jakeem for T-Bolt. I'd rather she stayed forgotten than going that route.



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