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Author
Jared






I arrived rather late to the Spider-Girl party, so I can't really call myself a hardcore fan, but right now it's one of the only two Marvel titles I find worth reading besides Spider-Man. The rest of the titles are, in my view, tainted by the stink of the Superhuman Registration Act, a violation of the most fundamental aspects of the Marvel Universe and an abomination of an idea so sickening that it poisons the whole Marvel Universe by its very presence and doesn't deserve to be called "groundbreaking" anymore than the work of Rob Liefeld and I think Millar and Bendis are overrated hacks and I could have pulled a better resolution out of my hairy...

...ahem.

As I was about to say before my blind hatred of the SHRA got me sidetracked, I feel for the diehard Spider-Girl fans who are upset that their series is being cancelled due to low sales. It's a sad reality, but one I can't entirely blame Marvel for, since at the end of the day they have to make business decisions that aren't always pleasant.

As I'm sure most people have noticed, I'm a diehard fan of Sleepwalker, who-and I swear I'm not making this up-was in fact the character that brought me back into comics and superheroes after almost a decade and a half-long absence. Like Dan Slott, I don't think Bob Budiansky ever got the respect he deserved for one of the most criminally underrated series Marvel has ever published, and that it's a shame no other writers have ever used any of Budiansky's creations, aside from Sleepwalker himself and 8-Ball. But, again, Sleepwalker's title wasn't selling enough, so it had to go.

Which characters do you miss, as a part of the cult following that enjoyed their adventures and would be happy to see them brought back? For me, those three heroes are Sleepwalker (naturally), Darkhawk and Spider-Girl.

At a time when a lot of the market has shifted towards dark, violent heroes or otherwise derailing established heroes and turning them into borderline fascists and treacherous backstabbers, Darkhawk, Sleepwalker and Spider-Girl were the heroes who actually did heroic things, who had their flaws but also their noble, kinder sides. In a way, by being "traditionally" heroic, they were almost subversive, maintaining that sense of good vs. evil and the secret identities, rogues galleries, and outlandish costumes and codenames that are part and parcel of what a superhero comic has to be.

Bob Budiansky, Danny Fingeroth and Tom DeFalco weren't Alan Moore, Jack Kirby or Frank Miller, but they didn't need to be, contributing fantastic bread-and-butter stories that remain enjoyable to read whether it's the first or hundred and first time. They left the Marvel Universe stronger than they left it...unlike Messrs. Millar, Bendis and Strazcynski, who are collectively in the process of leaving the artistic equivalent of a giant steaming pile on the MU.

Post the cult following characters you love, and more particularly what you loved about them. I'm especially interested in seeing just WHY fans love otherwise obscure characters.


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Abe


Location: Melbourne, Australia
Member Since: Sat May 17, 2008
Posts: 1,977


>
>
> I arrived rather late to the Spider-Girl party, so I can't really call myself a hardcore fan, but right now it's one of the only two Marvel titles I find worth reading besides Spider-Man. The rest of the titles are, in my view, tainted by the stink of the Superhuman Registration Act, a violation of the most fundamental aspects of the Marvel Universe and an abomination of an idea so sickening that it poisons the whole Marvel Universe by its very presence and doesn't deserve to be called "groundbreaking" anymore than the work of Rob Liefeld and I think Millar and Bendis are overrated hacks and I could have pulled a better resolution out of my hairy...
>
> ...ahem.
>
> As I was about to say before my blind hatred of the SHRA got me sidetracked, I feel for the diehard Spider-Girl fans who are upset that their series is being cancelled due to low sales. It's a sad reality, but one I can't entirely blame Marvel for, since at the end of the day they have to make business decisions that aren't always pleasant.
>
> As I'm sure most people have noticed, I'm a diehard fan of Sleepwalker, who-and I swear I'm not making this up-was in fact the character that brought me back into comics and superheroes after almost a decade and a half-long absence. Like Dan Slott, I don't think Bob Budiansky ever got the respect he deserved for one of the most criminally underrated series Marvel has ever published, and that it's a shame no other writers have ever used any of Budiansky's creations, aside from Sleepwalker himself and 8-Ball. But, again, Sleepwalker's title wasn't selling enough, so it had to go.
>
> Which characters do you miss, as a part of the cult following that enjoyed their adventures and would be happy to see them brought back? For me, those three heroes are Sleepwalker (naturally), Darkhawk and Spider-Girl.
>
> At a time when a lot of the market has shifted towards dark, violent heroes or otherwise derailing established heroes and turning them into borderline fascists and treacherous backstabbers, Darkhawk, Sleepwalker and Spider-Girl were the heroes who actually did heroic things, who had their flaws but also their noble, kinder sides. In a way, by being "traditionally" heroic, they were almost subversive, maintaining that sense of good vs. evil and the secret identities, rogues galleries, and outlandish costumes and codenames that are part and parcel of what a superhero comic has to be.
>
> Bob Budiansky, Danny Fingeroth and Tom DeFalco weren't Alan Moore, Jack Kirby or Frank Miller, but they didn't need to be, contributing fantastic bread-and-butter stories that remain enjoyable to read whether it's the first or hundred and first time. They left the Marvel Universe stronger than they left it...unlike Messrs. Millar, Bendis and Strazcynski, who are collectively in the process of leaving the artistic equivalent of a giant steaming pile on the MU.
>
> Post the cult following characters you love, and more particularly what you loved about them. I'm especially interested in seeing just WHY fans love otherwise obscure characters.

Ravage 2099. Well the 2099 Universe as a whole, but particularly Ravage 2099.
Just check out the 2099 UGR Message Board. The first issue of my Ravage 2099 mini-series is up there now.
What do I love about him? He actually made the environment an interested premise to fight for.
Also the fact that he was changing throughout his entire series was something I really dug.
Love to know what everyone thinks of the mini.


Posted with Microsoft Internet Explorer 7 on Windows Vista
FirstChAoS





Sounds like you share my opinions of Bendis and Miller.


>
> Which characters do you miss, as a part of the cult following that enjoyed their adventures and would be happy to see them brought back? For me, those three heroes are Sleepwalker (naturally), Darkhawk and Spider-Girl.
>

I am not sure why but I tend to be drawn to the underdogs. The obscure characters who are second rate.

The original new warriors are my favorite. as a kid i collected it regularly and had the first 30 issues. From what I seen only Fab Nic could write the new warriors well. (though I bet slott and maybe busiek could). My favorite New Warrior was Speedball, so of course marvel had to ruin him. I want the real speedball back. No more penance or super monkey ball (who IS more a speedball than penance). I want the masochist retconned out of existance.

I loved the new warriors as it was a series i got from the start and was not lost in, it was a fun story that was well written and had memorable scenes and arcs that stay with me until today. I still fondly recall the forever yesterday universe, justice going to jail and helping make life bett6er for the prisoners while their, the justice firestar romance, the shock of nova being dropped from the roof, etc. For speedball he always was a fun, hyper, rambling ball of energy who always made me laugh. That and despite his powers seeming useless at first they were always hinted at as having limitless potential if only he's explore them meaning he had alot of growth potential.

I also love the GLA. I loved them from their first AWC appearance. I love both the losers with potential if only they had the training, and the humor team versions of them. Though I admit I'd prefer seeing them as losers with potential with some humor mixed in. Though I like every GLA member I DO think having Squirrel Girl portrayed as invincible and unbeatable ruins the losers with potential feel and i sort of want that outside of canon.

I also read guardians of the Galaxy and loved them, especially the starhawk origin story and seeing future versions and descendants of marvel heros, and X-factor too. PAD is on X-factor again, but sadly i dropped it as this is not the PAD X-factor i loved in the 90's. The new one is grim and humorless.

I also like Ultra girl (a pitty artists forgot her muscles, she is the only girl in comics that could look cute and soft with muscles), Living Lightning, Dr Goodwrench, Meggan Braddock (I loved how the artists kept her eyes and mouth girly as a man so you can still see meggan inside, and her unstability and unconscious chameleon nature of her powers was fun), and a host of other obscure characters.

Then of course are the minor characters I like not because they are that good of characters but because I read of them in stories as a kid and I am curious on seeing them again. They varry from Vibro and Starthief (Ditmal), to Surfstreak. None were that good, but having read stories with them in it as a kid their absence feels like something missing.

> At a time when a lot of the market has shifted towards dark, violent heroes or otherwise derailing established heroes and turning them into borderline fascists and treacherous backstabbers, Darkhawk, Sleepwalker and Spider-Girl were the heroes who actually did heroic things, who had their flaws but also their noble, kinder sides. In a way, by being "traditionally" heroic, they were almost subversive, maintaining that sense of good vs. evil and the secret identities, rogues galleries, and outlandish costumes and codenames that are part and parcel of what a superhero comic has to be.
>

I agree, we need more bright heros in marvel. Dark heros are not new. But before they were always contained to certain lines and titles, now they are taking over marvel as a whole. Dark heros should be rounded up and kept semi seperate from the main MU in a line with a safe title such as Knights, Ultimate, or Max.



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Corn




Photobucket


> I arrived rather late to the Spider-Girl party, so I can't really call myself a hardcore fan, but right now it's one of the only two Marvel titles I find worth reading besides Spider-Man. The rest of the titles are, in my view, tainted by the stink of the Superhuman Registration Act, a violation of the most fundamental aspects of the Marvel Universe and an abomination of an idea so sickening that it poisons the whole Marvel Universe by its very presence and doesn't deserve to be called "groundbreaking" anymore than the work of Rob Liefeld and I think Millar and Bendis are overrated hacks and I could have pulled a better resolution out of my hairy...

SPIDERGIRL is DeFalco's best. I was never a fan of his THOR or FF.

> ...ahem.
>
> As I was about to say before my blind hatred of the SHRA got me sidetracked, I feel for the diehard Spider-Girl fans who are upset that their series is being cancelled due to low sales. It's a sad reality, but one I can't entirely blame Marvel for, since at the end of the day they have to make business decisions that aren't always pleasant.

It hit #100. That's saying something. It's little compensation, naturally.

> As I'm sure most people have noticed, I'm a diehard fan of Sleepwalker,

Check.

> ....who-and I swear I'm not making this up-was in fact the character that brought me back into comics and superheroes after almost a decade and a half-long absence. Like Dan Slott, I don't think Bob Budiansky ever got the respect he deserved for one of the most criminally underrated series Marvel has ever published, and that it's a shame no other writers have ever used any of Budiansky's creations, aside from Sleepwalker himself and 8-Ball. But, again, Sleepwalker's title wasn't selling enough, so it had to go.

I still haven't found one to sample. Is MS MARVEL the other Marvel comic you get?

> Which characters do you miss, as a part of the cult following that enjoyed their adventures and would be happy to see them brought back? For me, those three heroes are Sleepwalker (naturally), Darkhawk and Spider-Girl.

Quasar - though NOVA is seeing to the continued career on Wendell Vaughn. I thought QUASAR was a great book (at least in the writing dept.) kept alive with increasingly frequent and interrupting crossovers - and art that seemed to get suckier just about every issue.

NOVA is one of the finest of MU books these days, and ideal for bringing back folk like - will you look at that? - Darkhawk, the Serpent Society, Wendell Vaughn... I hope it's blasted sales improve!

> Bob Budiansky, Danny Fingeroth and Tom DeFalco weren't Alan Moore, Jack Kirby or Frank Miller, but they didn't need to be, contributing fantastic bread-and-butter stories that remain enjoyable to read whether it's the first or hundred and first time. They left the Marvel Universe stronger than they left it...unlike Messrs. Millar, Bendis and Strazcynski, who are collectively in the process of leaving the artistic equivalent of a giant steaming pile on the MU.

I like JMS' THOR - and TWELVE - but not his SPIDERMAN or FF.

> Post the cult following characters you love, and more particularly what you loved about them. I'm especially interested in seeing just WHY fans love otherwise obscure characters.

Well, Quasar was sort of marginalised in the 90's - a book with all its old fashioned points stood out like a throbbing sore thumb, and couldn't distinguish itself quite the way Waid's CAPTAIN AMERICA and FLASH did in that blood-on-the-floor age of Big Guns and Bigger Breasts. QUASAR had little or no luck with artists once Greg Capullo found a market drawing SPAWN... Mark Gruenwald seemed to enjoy writing QUASAR as though it was a DC book coming out of Marvel. Barry Allen from DC appeared - of course he had the name Buried Alien.

Other obscure characters I enjoy: they prolly have a cult following of zip...

Darkoth, Razor-Fist, Brynocki, the Prime Mover, Nekra... But these are villains.

I really enjoyed Mantis in the 70's when she was... unexplained. A bit like Elektra in DD and the Black Orchid at DC. Since she's been Cotati-green and "powered", she hasn't seemed even half as intriguing. Still, I look forward to picking up GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY - which has another dwindled-to-a-cult star, Adam Warlock.

From the 70's: Jack of Hearts, White Tiger, Man-Thing, Howard the Duck, Shang-Chi, WBN Werewolf, Dracula for some more...

Hopefully Dracula's CAPTAIN BRITAIN appearance will rival his last decent appearance in the pages of DOCTOR STRANGE (by Roger Stern, Dan Green and Terry Austin.)

Cornelius
Photobucket
Reading: Just about ready to kiss the delightful SUPERGIRL SHOWCASE vol. 2 goodbye and wait for the next one. After reading AVENGERS VS JLA, I've been enthused into tackling AVENGERS ESSENTIALS vol. 4 (by Roy Thomas and with the Kree/Skrull War, Squadron Sinister and Squadron Supreme) again and the early Jim Shooter AVENGERS (approx. #155-168) issues with Nefaria, Graviton, Ultron and the Grim Reaper, drawn by John Byrne in his prime, Perez and Sal Buscema. Also: USE OF WEAPONS by Iain Banks.
Listening: Flamenco. It's sitting in the computer by chance and there's no reason to dig it out yet.
Flicks: SUPERMAN RETURNS.
Doco: THE FOG OF WAR. Watched it about twelve times now.





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Banepool





Most of mine have been said already, but I've always had a dream of a superhero team made of:

1) Deadpool
2) Sleepwalker
3) Darkhawk
4) Cloak & Dagger
5) Banshee
6) Slapstick
7) Cardiac
8) Beta Ray Bill

Yes, I know...that book would last maybe 3 issues...but hey....those are the guys I miss. (Ok...Deadpool still gets air time...but he needs more)

And they can fight the villain from the New Warrior's annual when Marvel had new characters in each annual. He controlled the Darkforce dimension.

Oh...and by the way...hi y'all

>
> I arrived rather late to the Spider-Girl party, so I can't really call myself a hardcore fan, but right now it's one of the only two Marvel titles I find worth reading besides Spider-Man. The rest of the titles are, in my view, tainted by the stink of the Superhuman Registration Act, a violation of the most fundamental aspects of the Marvel Universe and an abomination of an idea so sickening that it poisons the whole Marvel Universe by its very presence and doesn't deserve to be called "groundbreaking" anymore than the work of Rob Liefeld and I think Millar and Bendis are overrated hacks and I could have pulled a better resolution out of my hairy...
>
> ...ahem.
>
> As I was about to say before my blind hatred of the SHRA got me sidetracked, I feel for the diehard Spider-Girl fans who are upset that their series is being cancelled due to low sales. It's a sad reality, but one I can't entirely blame Marvel for, since at the end of the day they have to make business decisions that aren't always pleasant.
>
> As I'm sure most people have noticed, I'm a diehard fan of Sleepwalker, who-and I swear I'm not making this up-was in fact the character that brought me back into comics and superheroes after almost a decade and a half-long absence. Like Dan Slott, I don't think Bob Budiansky ever got the respect he deserved for one of the most criminally underrated series Marvel has ever published, and that it's a shame no other writers have ever used any of Budiansky's creations, aside from Sleepwalker himself and 8-Ball. But, again, Sleepwalker's title wasn't selling enough, so it had to go.
>
> Which characters do you miss, as a part of the cult following that enjoyed their adventures and would be happy to see them brought back? For me, those three heroes are Sleepwalker (naturally), Darkhawk and Spider-Girl.
>
> At a time when a lot of the market has shifted towards dark, violent heroes or otherwise derailing established heroes and turning them into borderline fascists and treacherous backstabbers, Darkhawk, Sleepwalker and Spider-Girl were the heroes who actually did heroic things, who had their flaws but also their noble, kinder sides. In a way, by being "traditionally" heroic, they were almost subversive, maintaining that sense of good vs. evil and the secret identities, rogues galleries, and outlandish costumes and codenames that are part and parcel of what a superhero comic has to be.
>
> Bob Budiansky, Danny Fingeroth and Tom DeFalco weren't Alan Moore, Jack Kirby or Frank Miller, but they didn't need to be, contributing fantastic bread-and-butter stories that remain enjoyable to read whether it's the first or hundred and first time. They left the Marvel Universe stronger than they left it...unlike Messrs. Millar, Bendis and Strazcynski, who are collectively in the process of leaving the artistic equivalent of a giant steaming pile on the MU.
>
> Post the cult following characters you love, and more particularly what you loved about them. I'm especially interested in seeing just WHY fans love otherwise obscure characters.



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Menshevik


Member Since: Sat May 17, 2008
Posts: 4,386


>
>
> I arrived rather late to the Spider-Girl party, so I can't really call myself a hardcore fan, but right now it's one of the only two Marvel titles I find worth reading besides Spider-Man. The rest of the titles are, in my view, tainted by the stink of the Superhuman Registration Act, a violation of the most fundamental aspects of the Marvel Universe and an abomination of an idea so sickening that it poisons the whole Marvel Universe by its very presence and doesn't deserve to be called "groundbreaking" anymore than the work of Rob Liefeld and I think Millar and Bendis are overrated hacks and I could have pulled a better resolution out of my hairy...

Well, Amazing Spider-Girl is one of the Marvel titles I still read apart from Spider-Man (which for me means Ultimate Spider-Man, Mr. and Mrs. Spider-Man and Spider-Man Loves Mary Jane, because for me Satanic Spider-Jerk is an even greater abomination than Civil War).
>
> ...ahem.

*ahem*

>
> As I was about to say before my blind hatred of the SHRA got me sidetracked, I feel for the diehard Spider-Girl fans who are upset that their series is being cancelled due to low sales. It's a sad reality, but one I can't entirely blame Marvel for, since at the end of the day they have to make business decisions that aren't always pleasant.
>
> As I'm sure most people have noticed, I'm a diehard fan of Sleepwalker, who-and I swear I'm not making this up-was in fact the character that brought me back into comics and superheroes after almost a decade and a half-long absence. Like Dan Slott, I don't think Bob Budiansky ever got the respect he deserved for one of the most criminally underrated series Marvel has ever published, and that it's a shame no other writers have ever used any of Budiansky's creations, aside from Sleepwalker himself and 8-Ball. But, again, Sleepwalker's title wasn't selling enough, so it had to go.
>
> Which characters do you miss, as a part of the cult following that enjoyed their adventures and would be happy to see them brought back? For me, those three heroes are Sleepwalker (naturally), Darkhawk and Spider-Girl.
>
> At a time when a lot of the market has shifted towards dark, violent heroes or otherwise derailing established heroes and turning them into borderline fascists and treacherous backstabbers, Darkhawk, Sleepwalker and Spider-Girl were the heroes who actually did heroic things, who had their flaws but also their noble, kinder sides. In a way, by being "traditionally" heroic, they were almost subversive, maintaining that sense of good vs. evil and the secret identities, rogues galleries, and outlandish costumes and codenames that are part and parcel of what a superhero comic has to be.
>
> Bob Budiansky, Danny Fingeroth and Tom DeFalco weren't Alan Moore, Jack Kirby or Frank Miller, but they didn't need to be, contributing fantastic bread-and-butter stories that remain enjoyable to read whether it's the first or hundred and first time. They left the Marvel Universe stronger than they left it...unlike Messrs. Millar, Bendis and Strazcynski, who are collectively in the process of leaving the artistic equivalent of a giant steaming pile on the MU.

Well, I'd have to disagree a bit there, e.g. I actually prefer Tom DeFalco's writing to Frank Miller's, I never really was that enamoured of Jack Kirby as a writer, I liked JMS's run on ASM for the most part and I love Powers and Ultimate Spider-Man by Bendis.
>
> Post the cult following characters you love, and more particularly what you loved about them. I'm especially interested in seeing just WHY fans love otherwise obscure characters.

1. May Parker. I would love to see her return to the mainstream Marvel Universe (the fact that this would probably undo the abomination of OMD etc. would be a valuable bonus). And of course I would love to see the teenage MC-2 version start her third title and continue it for many years.
2. GLA and Squirrel Girl. I love those losers of the Great Lakes and Doreen Green is a wonderful antidote to the gloom and doom that typefies so much of current superhero fare. Dan Slott could write it when he's taken off ASM (the GLA mini-series and specials were Slott's only Marvel work I unreservedly enjoyed).
3. Howard the Duck. But only if they raise Steve Gerber from the dead to write it. \:\-\(
4. Hawk & Dove (the Kesel version with the Dawn Granger as Dove). The best Marvel comic DC ever produced. I still haven't forgiven DC for the ending of Armageddon 2001.
5. Young Avengers. I'd really want them to become a regular feature.
6. I also wouldn't mind seeing the return of Ben Reilly.
Let's stop here for now.


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Johnny Thrillkill




If you hadn't heard, Darkhawk will be a getting a 2-issue mini starting this month (I think) that will be crossing over into the "War of Kings" Storyline. It's suppose to bring him back out of obscurity and place him into an important role in the Marvel Universe.
That might make your day! ;\)

>
> I arrived rather late to the Spider-Girl party, so I can't really call myself a hardcore fan, but right now it's one of the only two Marvel titles I find worth reading besides Spider-Man. The rest of the titles are, in my view, tainted by the stink of the Superhuman Registration Act, a violation of the most fundamental aspects of the Marvel Universe and an abomination of an idea so sickening that it poisons the whole Marvel Universe by its very presence and doesn't deserve to be called "groundbreaking" anymore than the work of Rob Liefeld and I think Millar and Bendis are overrated hacks and I could have pulled a better resolution out of my hairy...
>
> ...ahem.
>
> As I was about to say before my blind hatred of the SHRA got me sidetracked, I feel for the diehard Spider-Girl fans who are upset that their series is being cancelled due to low sales. It's a sad reality, but one I can't entirely blame Marvel for, since at the end of the day they have to make business decisions that aren't always pleasant.
>
> As I'm sure most people have noticed, I'm a diehard fan of Sleepwalker, who-and I swear I'm not making this up-was in fact the character that brought me back into comics and superheroes after almost a decade and a half-long absence. Like Dan Slott, I don't think Bob Budiansky ever got the respect he deserved for one of the most criminally underrated series Marvel has ever published, and that it's a shame no other writers have ever used any of Budiansky's creations, aside from Sleepwalker himself and 8-Ball. But, again, Sleepwalker's title wasn't selling enough, so it had to go.
>
> Which characters do you miss, as a part of the cult following that enjoyed their adventures and would be happy to see them brought back? For me, those three heroes are Sleepwalker (naturally), Darkhawk and Spider-Girl.
>
> At a time when a lot of the market has shifted towards dark, violent heroes or otherwise derailing established heroes and turning them into borderline fascists and treacherous backstabbers, Darkhawk, Sleepwalker and Spider-Girl were the heroes who actually did heroic things, who had their flaws but also their noble, kinder sides. In a way, by being "traditionally" heroic, they were almost subversive, maintaining that sense of good vs. evil and the secret identities, rogues galleries, and outlandish costumes and codenames that are part and parcel of what a superhero comic has to be.
>
> Bob Budiansky, Danny Fingeroth and Tom DeFalco weren't Alan Moore, Jack Kirby or Frank Miller, but they didn't need to be, contributing fantastic bread-and-butter stories that remain enjoyable to read whether it's the first or hundred and first time. They left the Marvel Universe stronger than they left it...unlike Messrs. Millar, Bendis and Strazcynski, who are collectively in the process of leaving the artistic equivalent of a giant steaming pile on the MU.
>
> Post the cult following characters you love, and more particularly what you loved about them. I'm especially interested in seeing just WHY fans love otherwise obscure characters.



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Unstable Molecule


Location: Calgary, AB Canada
Member Since: Sat May 17, 2008
Posts: 2,924



> Post the cult following characters you love, and more particularly what you loved about them. I'm especially interested in seeing just WHY fans love otherwise obscure characters.

Not sure if these people qualify as obscure in all cases, but I'd love to see a return of:

1) Alpha Flight - Guardian, Northstar, Aurora, Sasquatch, Puck, Shaman, Snowbird, Marina. Because they're a fascinating, disfunctional non-team, and I'm Canadian.

2) The original New Mutants - Rahne, Dani, Sam, Roberto, Amara, Illyana, Shan, Doug and Warlock. With Alpha Flight, these two comics were my favourites when I first got into comics.

2) Monica Rambeau - mostly because of her personality. In Stern's imagining, she was the best leader the Avengers ever had (after Captain America I).

3) Stegron - because an evil stegasaurus is just cool.

4) The Basilisk - had a great look and a great power-set. Had potential to be a really great villain (darn you, Scourge!).

6) Valkyrie - once a major character in the MU. Wore a cone-bra when cone-bras weren't cool.

7) Starfox - even the Scarlet Witch admitted she kinda liked the way he just "stood around".

8) The Elders of the Universe - especially the Collector and the Grandmaster. When Thanos went after them to collect the infinity gems, I fell in love with these cosmic oddballs.

9) The Shaper of Worlds - because he was the villain in my first Marvel/DC crossover. He caused a world of trouble to both Hulk AND Batman (with the Joker nipping at their heels too).





And a lean, silent figure slowly fades into the gathering darkness, aware at last that in this world, with great power there must also come -- great responsibility!
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