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Iron Man Unit 007


Member Since: Thu Oct 20, 2011
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4 episodes so far, another 4 I think will be added in the future.

Each episode is interviews with the people that created some of the successful toylines in history.

Ep 1: tells the tale of how a small company named Kenner obtained the toy license for STAR WARS

Ep 2: the history of Barbie (I passed on this epiosde)

Ep 3: the toyline that would give Star Wars serious competition and led to the first cartoon designed for the sole purpose of selling toys: MASTERS OF THE UNIVERSE

Ep 4: G.I. JOE


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America's Captain 

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Superman's Pal

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I watched the same three episodes you did. I may catch Barbie later.

I felt they sort of glossed over Kenner's acquisition by Hasbro. They talked about Hasbro's bungling of the perfect contract and having to renegotiate. But why exactly did Kenner have to sell?

They didn't talk about the commonly held belief that Marvel contracted Hasbro for a SHIELD vs Hydra line of figures and when they pulled the license, Hasbro replaced SHIELD with GI Joe and Hydra with Cobra.




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Iron Man Unit 007


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https://www.bleedingcool.com/2017/12/30/netflix-toys-made-us-pretty-freaking-great/

Looks like Transformers, Lego, Hello Kitty and Star Trek will be next.


As to the Masters of the Universe, I got many chuckles out of that one and the tales they spun about how things came to be. Truly things came together to form a perfect storm. Also the implication is that the addition of She-Ra may be what started the collapse.

They also all agree that horrific life action movie did NOT help.

The 90's one with He-Man in space, I remember seeing a couple of episodes....what a dud.


The 2002 reboot...they needed to talk about that more, I feel they glossed that one over. There were rumors that the toys suffered a similar problem mentioned in this episode about the merchandising of the original line in that eventually the core figures like He-Man and Skeletor were not in the packages sent to the stores but all the secondary characters were constantly being made and shipped thus collectors and kids can't get the core figures.

A case full of Buzzoff or Stratos doesn't exactly guarantee sales.

The 2002 cartoon was also well structured and actually started the conflict at the beginning and gave us origins of He-Man and Skeletor, and also made it where Adam being He-Man was no where NEAR as obvious as it was back in the day.


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America's Captain 

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    Quote:
    I watched the same three episodes you did. I may catch Barbie later.



    Quote:
    I felt they sort of glossed over Kenner's acquisition by Hasbro. They talked about Hasbro's bungling of the perfect contract and having to renegotiate. But why exactly did Kenner have to sell?


I remember Kenner. I don't know what toy of theirs I had but I definitely had something.


    Quote:
    They didn't talk about the commonly held belief that Marvel contracted Hasbro for a SHIELD vs Hydra line of figures and when they pulled the license, Hasbro replaced SHIELD with GI Joe and Hydra with Cobra.


Wow! I never heard that. How cool would a SHIELD versus Hydra line have been? Nick Fury! I loved that guy. I would definitely have bought toy versions of him. Even in my 20s!








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Superman's Pal

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    Quote:
    Looks like Transformers, Lego, Hello Kitty and Star Trek will be next.

Transformers I am looking forward to. LEGO already has a full-length doc on Netflix, so it seems redundant. Hello Kitty I don't really know or care about, and when it comes to Star Trek I don't think of toys really. But I'll check it out.


    Quote:

    As to the Masters of the Universe, I got many chuckles out of that one and the tales they spun about how things came to be. Truly things came together to form a perfect storm. Also the implication is that the addition of She-Ra may be what started the collapse.



    Quote:
    They also all agree that horrific life action movie did NOT help.

I don't understand why they would license a property and then not use anything from that property and just make up a bunch of new stuff? Just like the Super Mario Bros. movie, I was always baffled by it.


    Quote:
    The 90's one with He-Man in space, I remember seeing a couple of episodes....what a dud.

I didn't hear about it until years later. Looks like Flash Gordon.


    Quote:

    The 2002 reboot...they needed to talk about that more, I feel they glossed that one over. There were rumors that the toys suffered a similar problem mentioned in this episode about the merchandising of the original line in that eventually the core figures like He-Man and Skeletor were not in the packages sent to the stores but all the secondary characters were constantly being made and shipped thus collectors and kids can't get the core figures.



    Quote:
    A case full of Buzzoff or Stratos doesn't exactly guarantee sales.


I didn't really get into this, I wasn't watching a lot of cartoons or retro stuff at the time, but I did see the pilot of the show and it looked pretty solid. The toys looked fantastic, like the originals only better. More detailed, more articulated. I don't understand that manufacturing problem. I mean maybe at first you overestimate the demand of the tertiary characters but wouldn't you notice the trend and adjust the manufacturing towards more of the core characters and less of the tertiary? The rarity might even cause a rise in interest on those characters.

I mean if it was a problem in the '80s couldn't they anticipate it in 2002?


    Quote:
    The 2002 cartoon was also well structured and actually started the conflict at the beginning and gave us origins of He-Man and Skeletor, and also made it where Adam being He-Man was no where NEAR as obvious as it was back in the day.

Well I still started out on the mini-comics and the DC comic so I never really liked the secret identity as Adam. Just keep him as He-Man all the time. Kind of like how Marvel's Thor eventually just eliminated Don Blake from the mythos.



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Superman's Pal

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    Quote:

      Quote:
      They didn't talk about the commonly held belief that Marvel contracted Hasbro for a SHIELD vs Hydra line of figures and when they pulled the license, Hasbro replaced SHIELD with GI Joe and Hydra with Cobra.



    Quote:
    Wow! I never heard that. How cool would a SHIELD versus Hydra line have been? Nick Fury! I loved that guy. I would definitely have bought toy versions of him. Even in my 20s!


From Wikipedia:

Prior to G.I. Joe's relaunch in 1982, Larry Hama was developing an idea for a new comic book called Fury Force, which he was hoping would be an ongoing series for Marvel Comics. The original premise had the son of S.H.I.E.L.D. director Nick Fury assembling a team of elite commandos to battle neo-Nazi terrorists HYDRA. Shooter approached Hama about the Joe project due to Hama's military background, and the Fury concept was adapted for the project. Shooter suggested to Hasbro that "G.I. Joe" should be the team name and that they should fight terrorists, while Archie Goodwin invented Cobra and the Cobra Commander; everything else was created by Hama. Hasbro was initially uncertain about making villain toys, believing this wouldn't sell. Marvel would also suggest the inclusion of female Joes in the toyline, and to include them with the vehicles (as Hasbro again worried they wouldn't sell on their own).

So I guess they didn't plan a line and pull the license, they simply had an idea that never took off and it coincided with Hasbro wanting to reinvent the Joe brand.



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America's Captain 

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    Quote:
    From Wikipedia:



    Quote:
    Prior to G.I. Joe's relaunch in 1982, Larry Hama was developing an idea for a new comic book called Fury Force, which he was hoping would be an ongoing series for Marvel Comics. The original premise had the son of S.H.I.E.L.D. director Nick Fury assembling a team of elite commandos to battle neo-Nazi terrorists HYDRA. Shooter approached Hama about the Joe project due to Hama's military background, and the Fury concept was adapted for the project. Shooter suggested to Hasbro that "G.I. Joe" should be the team name and that they should fight terrorists, while Archie Goodwin invented Cobra and the Cobra Commander; everything else was created by Hama. Hasbro was initially uncertain about making villain toys, believing this wouldn't sell. Marvel would also suggest the inclusion of female Joes in the toyline, and to include them with the vehicles (as Hasbro again worried they wouldn't sell on their own).


That's one instinct Marvel always had: Villains sell.


    Quote:
    So I guess they didn't plan a line and pull the license, they simply had an idea that never took off and it coincided with Hasbro wanting to reinvent the Joe brand.


I wonder if Larry Hama and Archie Goodwin get credited in the GI Joe films.






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Superman's Pal

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    Quote:
    I wonder if Larry Hama and Archie Goodwin get credited in the GI Joe films.

I don't know, but I know the Tunnel Rat character was based on Hama and his likeness, so maybe he gets royalties on that? I believe he also came back to write comics for Devil's Due and IDW so he is held in high regard by fans and still gets work from it.



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Nose Norton


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Thanks for mentioning this. I watched the Star Wars episode. I liked the details of how Lucas and Kenner got the deal done.

The first trilogy Star Wars toys really interest me but Barbie, Masters Of The Universe and G.I. Joe don't really. I might watch the Star Trek episode but I'd really only be interested in the 70's Mego toys.


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Iron Man Unit 007


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Hama is to the GI JOe comics what Simon Furman is to the Transformers comics.


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Dakota


Member Since: Sat May 17, 2008
Posts: 393



    Quote:
    Hama is to the GI JOe comics what Simon Furman is to the Transformers comics.


Depends on how you mean the comparison. From a creator standpoint, Bob Budiansky is the one who named most of the original Transformers and wrote the "tech specs" included with each toy. So he would be the Larry Hama equivalent from the creator side.


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Iron Man Unit 007


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True but he also came up with bad ideas like Circuit breaker and optimus prime's memory stored on an old floppy disc.

Furman of course tends to overuse Galvatron and Unicron so both have their flaws.


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Superman's Pal

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    Quote:
    True but he also came up with bad ideas like Circuit breaker and optimus prime's memory stored on an old floppy disc.

Circuit Breaker wasn't a bad idea, she just wasn't used well. Too overpowered.

Prime's brain on a disc wasn't any dumber than Starscream's ghost. Kid stuff meant for fun. The spark retcon covers them both well enough, the floppy was just a tether.


    Quote:
    Furman of course tends to overuse Galvatron and Unicron so both have their flaws.

I guess I only know Furman from the last 20 or so issues of Marvel US and G2, and neither were all that stunning. How much of the UK run did he do? All of it? I suppose that was his most celebrated contribution.

Didn't he come up with those dippy superheroes at the end of the US run?

I liked Thunderwing though.


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Iron Man Unit 007


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Star scream's Ghost was far better then an old floppy disc possibly containing the brain data/persona of an alien robot. Talk about data compression ;\)

Furman did do much of the UK run and it is a shame that certain stories like Target 2006 and Time war weren't in the US series.

Ewww the Ne0-Knights.....rip offs of the X-men since the TF's were moved to a separate universe from the main MU after the miniseries.


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Superman's Pal

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    Quote:
    Star scream's Ghost was far better then an old floppy disc possibly containing the brain data/persona of an alien robot. Talk about data compression ;\)

How about the Autobot brains attached to the RC cars? Just hook up the optic circuits to the car headlights so they can see! Of course!


    Quote:
    Furman did do much of the UK run and it is a shame that certain stories like Target 2006 and Time war weren't in the US series.

Some of that got reprinted by IDW didn't it? I think I have a few of the UK reprints.


    Quote:
    Ewww the Ne0-Knights.....rip offs of the X-men since the TF's were moved to a separate universe from the main MU after the miniseries.

But even after the first mini didn't Circuit Breaker show up in Secret Wars II or something? Lol.




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