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adamwarlock




Seems to me the hate for mutants in the Marvel U is way out of whack. We've been told so many times how humanity hates mutants and the very likely future is that mutants will be killed or separated from humanity.

Now I can believe the government would feel threatened and some of the public would too. But wouldn't there be a movement among humans that is pro-mutant? We've seen individuals stand up for mutants but never as a group.

Certainly in our world, whites stood with blacks during the Civil Rights Movement and straights have stood with gays during their struggles. One would think there would be those on the mutants side (spearheaded by parents/loved ones of mutants) that would try to tip the scales. The San Francisco move made sense along these lines but that didn't last very long.

Of course, the mutants being friendless and on the verge of a holocaust is more dramatic but we've been on this "the hate against mutants is worse than it's ever been" kick for 30 years now. Let's have some peaks and valleys to it.


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Phenomenon_Hunter




We can all think of the valleys, with Operation: Zero Tolerance and Operation: Wide Awake, etc.

Harder to think of the peaks. Here are some off the top of my head:

1. X-Factor Vol.1 #26 - X-Factor, consisting of the original X-Men had just saved New York from Apoclaypse and his Horsemen. New York held a street parade for the mutants, celebrating them as heroes.

2. Uncanny X-Men #228 - the X-Men were fighting the Adversary in Dallas at Forge's tower. Two reporters were swept up in the commotion, and were reporting and filming the entire battle. The X-Men were being seen as the heroes they truly were, and this was being telecast live. The X-Men were seen as heroes as they gave up their lives to stop the Adversary, live on tv, and they were revered as heroes for a short time after that.

3. Uncanny X-Men - whatever number issue #1 of the X-Cutioner's song crossover is - Professor Xavier addresses a crowd of humans at a concert in Central Park, advocating the rights of mutants. He is gunned down by Stryfe posing as Cable, but he was getting his message across. I am sure this was earning him some good will for mutants.

Those are three exampls off the top of my head. I am sure there are more.


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The Black Guardian 

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Posts: 25,919


I've often thought that Marvel Earth never fully got over the eugenics movements of the 19th and early 20th centuries. So much is still tied to Nazis and super soldiers and genetic supremacy.




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adamwarlock




OK, some good ones although I recall Professor X getting booed by the crowd when he made his speech. But for any time the X-Men got a little credit, there would be some horrendous act done by or blamed on a mutant and we'd be told "we're never been so close to extinction!" only to have it simmer over & go on like usual. I'll like to see the man on the street saying something pro-mutant like someone saved by the X-Men. Have them debate the haters on TV.

One thing that's odd since M-Day, why be up in arms over mutants at all anymore if there's only 200 left? The fear was about more mutants being born, if that was seemingly gone, no need for that Church of Humanity crap.


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Daveym

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Location: Lancashire
Member Since: Sat May 17, 2008
Posts: 39,155



Yes I think the idea the Marvel Universe is more Racist than the real world is a given, especially the US. The political climate against Mutants and heroes in general today is presented so OTT by the books it's a wonder society functions in the MU.

It's comparatively rare to see positive moments for the X-Men and mutants in general as the shafts of light tend to be brief and far between, other coutries - I remember a nice moment in Uncanny #200 in Paris Kitty Pryde seeing protesters outside the supreme court thinks the worst but is corrected that they are in fact pro-mutant demonstrators. A really nice moment that actually....
Excalibur were accepted as Britains first line of Heroes and seemed immune to the politics elsewhere in the X-Books.
San Franscisco has always been friendly to the X-Men and Mutants.







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Super Rubbery Bung






    Quote:
    Excalibur were accepted as Britains first line of Heroes and seemed immune to the politics elsewhere in the X-Books.


Most of Excalibur weren't mutants and it did help to be led by the UK's version of Captain America, who is also a multidimensional hero to boot, married to someone mystically attached to the British Isles. Even when the roster had the likes of Pete Wisdom, Kitty Pryde, Nightcrawler and Wolfsbane I never saw it as a mutant or political book and their mysteries were well contained within their pages.

In a sense Excalibur was the Aveengers without the federal interference.


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    San Franscisco has always been friendly to the X-Men and Mutants.


who is San Fran not friendly to?


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Super Rubbery Bung





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    I've often thought that Marvel Earth never fully got over the eugenics movements of the 19th and early 20th centuries. So much is still tied to Nazis and super soldiers and genetic supremacy.



In the Punisher series a mummy leads Frank to the Monster Metropolis, where monsters from all over live away from humanity. Frank asks the mummy why they don't go to the X-Men "for a good sob".

The mummy replies that the monsters do not invite conflict like the X-Men and literally want to be left alone, even though they will fight for man when necessary.

The conversation occurs outside of the X-Universe but I do wonder if the X-Men's rather proactive stance promotes more conflict than it should. Even though Deadpool recently put them in a good light with some cheeky media manipulation, the X-Men are still generally seen as a mutant militia force with scary uniforms and a political agenda by many.
Beast is probably exempted due to his Avengers past (and the fact that his mutation is partly artificial) but generally in recent times the X-Men have been fighting to be recognized as a force both in politics and the superhero biz.

The Monster Legion avoids contact as much as possible but the X-Men have engaged America like no other- have they become a magnet and unwitting amplification for mutant hate?


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Beowulf





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      Quote:
      Excalibur were accepted as Britains first line of Heroes and seemed immune to the politics elsewhere in the X-Books.



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    Most of Excalibur weren't mutants and it did help to be led by the UK's version of Captain America, who is also a multidimensional hero to boot, married to someone mystically attached to the British Isles. Even when the roster had the likes of Pete Wisdom, Kitty Pryde, Nightcrawler and Wolfsbane I never saw it as a mutant or political book and their mysteries were well contained within their pages.


Actually with the exception of Captain Britain(and one can argue about his non-mutant status) all of the members were mutants, including Meggan. Cerise as alien was also a non-mutant.



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    In a sense Excalibur was the Aveengers without the federal interference.


I agree.
I think, it did hurt the book a lot, that the writers post-Davis turned it back into just another X-Book, when it had started as superhero teambook.



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Mark




who is San Fran not friendly to?

Conservatives.


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