Dave Galanter
December 1st 1969 - December 12th 2020
He was loved.

Batman >> View Post
·
Post By
Blue Jay

In Reply To
BMK!

Subj: Re: Without Joker's Origin, he has no tie to Batman and is not relatable.
Posted: Thu Dec 06, 2007 at 11:05:58 pm EST (Viewed 1 times)
Reply Subj: Re: Without Joker's Origin, he has no tie to Batman and is not relatable.
Posted: Thu Dec 06, 2007 at 10:59:22 pm EST

Previous Post


>
> Sure Joker can work without an origin, but then you cannot really see the comparison between Joker and Batman. Having Joker's origin by way of the Killing Joke and The Man Who Laughs shows what Batman could have been could had he been had he lived another life and makes the Joker relatable. Without that the Joker's ties to Batman are tenous at best, he is not relatable, and he becomes just another crazy villain. I mean imagine not having Two-Face's origin, he would just be some wacko with two faces, instead of a scarred DA who fought for justice and used to be Bruce and Batman's friend until a tragedy happened that turned him into a monster.
>

The Joker had worked as a character concept before even his origin had even been attempted, and he was not just another "crazy villain" as you say. His first couple of appearances were chilling, to say the least, which is what serves as inspiration for the Joker in The Dark Knight. In the film the Joker represents a new breed of villain that Batman had not fully considered, (only sparked at the end of the first film)that of a man who represents anarchy at it's fullest. It is also said that the Joker is scarred, yes, but paints his face (like war paint) to undermine and create fear as much as a symbol as Batman is, and to create chaos and bloodshed, thereby making him a great polar opposite to Batman.

It is not necessary to establish an origin for the Joker in order for him to work as a concept. It is also not necessary to adapt The Killing Joke, when they are striving to create a Joker that remains true to the spirit of the character to to fit in more with the more real-world approach that Batman Begins sought after.

-BMK!-

>
> >
> > Sure Joker can work without an origin, but then you cannot really see the comparison between Joker and Batman. Having Joker's origin by way of the Killing Joke and The Man Who Laughs shows what Batman could have been could had he been had he lived another life and makes the Joker relatable. Without that the Joker's ties to Batman are tenous at best, he is not relatable, and he becomes just another crazy villain. I mean imagine not having Two-Face's origin, he would just be some wacko with two faces, instead of a scarred DA who fought for justice and used to be Bruce and Batman's friend until a tragedy happened that turned him into a monster.
> >
>
> The Joker had worked as a character concept before even his origin had even been attempted, and he was not just another "crazy villain" as you say. His first couple of appearances were chilling, to say the least, which is what serves as inspiration for the Joker in The Dark Knight. In the film the Joker represents a new breed of villain that Batman had not fully considered, (only sparked at the end of the first film)that of a man who represents anarchy at it's fullest. It is also said that the Joker is scarred, yes, but paints his face (like war paint) to undermine and create fear as much as a symbol as Batman is, and to create chaos and bloodshed, thereby making him a great polar opposite to Batman.
>
> It is not necessary to establish an origin for the Joker in order for him to work as a concept. It is also not necessary to adapt The Killing Joke, when they are striving to create a Joker that remains true to the spirit of the character to to fit in more with the more real-world approach that Batman Begins sought after.
>
> -BMK!-

Yeah, his earlier appearances were chilling, but not as chilling as his appearance in Batman: The Killing Joke. \:\-\)

Sure the Joker is Batman's opposite, but without the Joker's origin the connection is only aesthetic, it is not definitive.

I am not asking for much. All I really need is for Joker in The Dark Knight to say: "All it takes is one bad day to make a normal man go insane." and that pretty much sums up Joker's origin. It is not at all difficult for Nolan to incorporate this and for all I know he probably has.

In Batman Begins Ra's and Scarecrow's origins were hinted at and referenced. At the very least Nolan could do the same for the Joker.


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