Dave Galanter
December 1st 1969 - December 12th 2020
He was loved.

Black Panther >> View Post
·
Post By
Ty

In Reply To
Yaw

Subj: Cross-Marketerize!!!
Posted: Wed Jun 20, 2007 at 12:53:44 pm EDT (Viewed 2 times)
Reply Subj: Oh I know
Posted: Wed Jun 20, 2007 at 12:33:40 pm EDT

Previous Post

> > THe fact of the matter is that all of his titles failed for whatever reason and he had long had a history of writing failing books within the industry.
> >
> PLEASE don't attack me Yaw. \:\-\)
>
> This is just some additional info regarding your words about Priest's last few books.
>
> From Priest's blog:
> "On PANTHER, I was always nagged about bringing in new reader, about making the series accessible. Which made perfect sense and was what the company was *supposed* to do. But, my thinking was, there’s only so much audience for Black Panther no matter who’s writing it and no matter what you do. Not to say things couldn’t be better, but, overall, part of the fun of PANTHER is how uncannily wily the guy is. It’s difficult to demonstrate wiliness *and* be completely transparent and accessible all at once. My approach, therefore, was usually to annoy the audience for a few arc installments until Panther started snapping all the mousetraps shut (one of my favorites: T’Challa making a monkey out of Iron Man and stealing his company with one phone call).
>
> Hard to do that and make it episodic and accessible."
>
> "That is, essentially, the BLACK PANTHER problem. Assembled together as a trade, they just read better. I’d crawl across cut glass if Marvel would release ENEMY OF THE STATE ii or STURM UND DRANG as trades. I guarantee they’d make a lot more sense.
>
> Kasper Panther was supposed to have Artist A on it, but he bailed for another project or something, and the whole BLACK AND WHITE arc—which I worked *incredibly* hard on—was given to an artist who’d never *seen* Brooklyn and had no idea at all about urban hip-hop culture: the very things Marvel was pressing us for (suggesting, essentially, that BLACK PANTHER wasn’t “black” or “street” enough).
>
> Which is why I enjoy writing novels. I don’t want to run around blaming artists—I’ve made far more than my own share of mistakes. But, with a novel, I can stand up and go, “Yup, I screwed that up.” In comics, there’s a team. Once a script is delivered to the editor, it’s out of my hands, but I tend to catch all the flak for it."


One could make a case for the external factors of why PRiest built a reputation of comic book failures. That is why I said "for whatever reason." My point was that it wasn't always entirely his fault like some Priest haters would lead folks to suggest. In my opinion I look at Priest and hudlin in the same light. They do some things I like and some things I don't like. While I think PRiest may have been a better writer, Hudlin is by far a better business man. But yes PRiest seems to have been screwed on more than one occasions. For me the Crew was the worst. He got bent over big time for that.

> > From Priest's blog:
> > "On PANTHER, I was always nagged about bringing in new reader, about making the series accessible. Which made perfect sense and was what the company was *supposed* to do. But, my thinking was, there�s only so much audience for Black Panther no matter who�s writing it and no matter what you do. Not to say things couldn�t be better, but, overall, part of the fun of PANTHER is how uncannily wily the guy is. It�s difficult to demonstrate wiliness *and* be completely transparent and accessible all at once. My approach, therefore, was usually to annoy the audience for a few arc installments until Panther started snapping all the mousetraps shut (one of my favorites: T�Challa making a monkey out of Iron Man and stealing his company with one phone call).
> >
> > Hard to do that and make it episodic and accessible."
> >
> > "That is, essentially, the BLACK PANTHER problem. Assembled together as a trade, they just read better. I�d crawl across cut glass if Marvel would release ENEMY OF THE STATE ii or STURM UND DRANG as trades. I guarantee they�d make a lot more sense.
> >
> > Kasper Panther was supposed to have Artist A on it, but he bailed for another project or something, and the whole BLACK AND WHITE arc�which I worked *incredibly* hard on�was given to an artist who�d never *seen* Brooklyn and had no idea at all about urban hip-hop culture: the very things Marvel was pressing us for (suggesting, essentially, that BLACK PANTHER wasn�t �black� or �street� enough).
> >
> > Which is why I enjoy writing novels. I don�t want to run around blaming artists�I�ve made far more than my own share of mistakes. But, with a novel, I can stand up and go, �Yup, I screwed that up.� In comics, there�s a team. Once a script is delivered to the editor, it�s out of my hands, but I tend to catch all the flak for it."
>
>
> One could make a case for the external factors of why PRiest built a reputation of comic book failures. That is why I said "for whatever reason." My point was that it wasn't always entirely his fault like some Priest haters would lead folks to suggest. In my opinion I look at Priest and hudlin in the same light. They do some things I like and some things I don't like. While I think PRiest may have been a better writer, Hudlin is by far a better business man. But yes PRiest seems to have been screwed on more than one occasions. For me the Crew was the worst. He got bent over big time for that.

Yeah, his Crew treatment was foul. Even though they tried to appease him with Cap and Falc. (Which they did, but the terrible art ended up screwing that title up anyway.)

Matter of fact when Priest said "there�s only so much audience for Black Panther no matter who�s writing it and no matter what you do.", I think Queseda and Hudlin have totally proven him wrong. And even though Hudlin supporters won't agree with my next assessment, Hudlin has taught Marvel a very valuable lesson.

Hudlin's writing is bad. (LOL) But they are selling 50,000 of these books even with the bad writing. If Marvel really wants to expand sales, offer Priest a job (again), give him a 2 year contract, and then read Hudlin's and Velvet Jones' new book "How To Be A Comic Pimp", and "Cross-Marketerize" (Hudlin's word from his book, not mine - LOL) that new book like crazy. That way you get a really original book and very decent sales figures.

Then like the word "DEF", we can have an all-out funeral for the phrase "Priest-Curse".


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