Dave Galanter
December 1st 1969 - December 12th 2020
He was loved.

Black Panther >> View Post
·
Post By
Loren

In Reply To
Halo82

Subj: Thanks *nt*
Posted: Wed Sep 26, 2007 at 05:19:23 pm EDT (Viewed 5 times)
Reply Subj: Once again Loren owns the debate. Good post. NT
Posted: Tue Sep 25, 2007 at 02:07:32 pm EDT (Viewed 5 times)

Previous Post

> > Within the Black Panther book we've seen a very inconsistent portrayal of T'Challa's history, starting with a complete retcon, then a slow assimilation of parts of T'Challa's original history, despite the fact that most of the two histories couldn't coexist.
>
>
>
> Right before the wedding, I did a big ol' analysis of why BP had to be a reboot. Every thing within the pages of the series up 'til that point pointed towards a complete reboot.
>
>
>
> Then the wedding happened.
>
>
>
> At the wedding, suddenly it was essential that T'Challa have a history with the Avengers, and with the West. You couldn't hype the issue if nobody had any relationships with the groom. So the guy who had seemingly met the X-Men and Luke Cage for the first time just a few issues earlier, was now old friends with Captain America and Iron Man and a whole slew of Marvel characters. The same Wakanda that had just expelled an overt American invasion and had been depicted as being heavily critical of the outside world, was now throwing open its doors to the entire outside world, and was having its royal ceremonies covered by American basic cable. Plus, as if to split the difference, Man-Ape shows up looking like his previous incarnation (the one who led a revolution, and murdered T'Challa's counterpart in cold blood), but behaving like a moron.
>
>
>
> And since the wedding, most everything has been played as if T'Challa is a long-time player in the Marvel Universe. The same series that eschewed continuity a year earlier is suddenly having its characterizations justified by citation to obscure back-up features from the early 1970s. T'Challa's energy dagger reappears, but in the context of this series, it operates as an outright deus ex machina. Klaw's back to normal.
>
>
>
> As you point out, the two histories don't fit together. Yet there's been relatively scant showing of this discrepancy within the pages of BP. I think that is because of what has been missing from this series.
>
>
>
> Despite having run for over two and a half years, Hudlin has done close to nil in terms of developing a supporting cast for his book. He brought in Storm, and he's temporarily brought in Johnny and Ben. He created Shuri, who hasn't really done anything. He created T'Shan, who hasn't really done anything. I'm not sure he's created anyone else nameworthy.
>
>
>
> At the same time, he's chosen to ignore earlier supporting characters. Pre-existing Wakandan characters (W'Kabi, Zuri, Taku) haven't been used. T'Challa's mother was used a bit, but her identity was kept vague for a long time. The Dora Milaje have been overhauled and stripped of names or any distinguishing characteristics or even simple characterization. Monica Lynne had a cameo, but only enough to illustrate that their history had been severely changed. Someone named Everett Ross bears little resemblance to the earlier Ross and shares none of the same history. The result of all this is that he doesn't have to address discrepancies in any of these relationships.
>
>
>
> Similarly, he's avoided using Panther villains (or any other villains BP has fought in the past), and the few he's used have lost their history. Klaw appeared, but was overhauled to such an extent that he was only recognizable through his weapon. Man-Ape cameoed as a doofus. And then there was the Zanda appearance. (Come to think of it, Man-Ape got taken down by Spider-Man, and Zanda tangled with Storm; did T'Challa actually confront either of them?) Through these means, the series avoids addressing even the simple matter of whether T'Challa has fought a given villain before, much less what the particulars of their history are.
>
>
>
> Finally, for a series that went to such effort to extol the virtues of Wakanda in its first arc, the country has been largely neglected ever since. Once the wedding was over, the series went on a world tour for four issues, to the US for the next five, and then into parallel alien worlds for at least the next six issues after that. Some characters have paid some lip service to the notion that T'Challa is neglecting his country, but it's the writer who's put him in that position. (Personally, I think that Hudlin painted himself into a corner. He set up a utopian Wakanda, and didn't realize until later how little story potential there is in the country he created. So he sends T'Challa off to fight zombies and Skrulls in a parallel universe instead.)

*Disclaimer* I do not always think I'm right, I do not have a problem admitting I'm wrong, and I don't consider my opinion to be "fact". If I don't write IMO in front of everything I say or I don't tuck my tail between my legs everytime someone disagrees with me it's simply cause...I mean what I say. I don't say something unless I believe it to be true. So if someone tries to police my opinion or pick an arguement over something trivial all I'll simply say is "read the fine print" I also don't care If I make a grammatical or spelling error. Thank you, have a nice day, Hakuna Matata, Live long and Prosper.

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> > > Within the Black Panther book we've seen a very inconsistent portrayal of T'Challa's history, starting with a complete retcon, then a slow assimilation of parts of T'Challa's original history, despite the fact that most of the two histories couldn't coexist.
> >
> >
> >
> > Right before the wedding, I did a big ol' analysis of why BP had to be a reboot. Every thing within the pages of the series up 'til that point pointed towards a complete reboot.
> >
> >
> >
> > Then the wedding happened.
> >
> >
> >
> > At the wedding, suddenly it was essential that T'Challa have a history with the Avengers, and with the West. You couldn't hype the issue if nobody had any relationships with the groom. So the guy who had seemingly met the X-Men and Luke Cage for the first time just a few issues earlier, was now old friends with Captain America and Iron Man and a whole slew of Marvel characters. The same Wakanda that had just expelled an overt American invasion and had been depicted as being heavily critical of the outside world, was now throwing open its doors to the entire outside world, and was having its royal ceremonies covered by American basic cable. Plus, as if to split the difference, Man-Ape shows up looking like his previous incarnation (the one who led a revolution, and murdered T'Challa's counterpart in cold blood), but behaving like a moron.
> >
> >
> >
> > And since the wedding, most everything has been played as if T'Challa is a long-time player in the Marvel Universe. The same series that eschewed continuity a year earlier is suddenly having its characterizations justified by citation to obscure back-up features from the early 1970s. T'Challa's energy dagger reappears, but in the context of this series, it operates as an outright deus ex machina. Klaw's back to normal.
> >
> >
> >
> > As you point out, the two histories don't fit together. Yet there's been relatively scant showing of this discrepancy within the pages of BP. I think that is because of what has been missing from this series.
> >
> >
> >
> > Despite having run for over two and a half years, Hudlin has done close to nil in terms of developing a supporting cast for his book. He brought in Storm, and he's temporarily brought in Johnny and Ben. He created Shuri, who hasn't really done anything. He created T'Shan, who hasn't really done anything. I'm not sure he's created anyone else nameworthy.
> >
> >
> >
> > At the same time, he's chosen to ignore earlier supporting characters. Pre-existing Wakandan characters (W'Kabi, Zuri, Taku) haven't been used. T'Challa's mother was used a bit, but her identity was kept vague for a long time. The Dora Milaje have been overhauled and stripped of names or any distinguishing characteristics or even simple characterization. Monica Lynne had a cameo, but only enough to illustrate that their history had been severely changed. Someone named Everett Ross bears little resemblance to the earlier Ross and shares none of the same history. The result of all this is that he doesn't have to address discrepancies in any of these relationships.
> >
> >
> >
> > Similarly, he's avoided using Panther villains (or any other villains BP has fought in the past), and the few he's used have lost their history. Klaw appeared, but was overhauled to such an extent that he was only recognizable through his weapon. Man-Ape cameoed as a doofus. And then there was the Zanda appearance. (Come to think of it, Man-Ape got taken down by Spider-Man, and Zanda tangled with Storm; did T'Challa actually confront either of them?) Through these means, the series avoids addressing even the simple matter of whether T'Challa has fought a given villain before, much less what the particulars of their history are.
> >
> >
> >
> > Finally, for a series that went to such effort to extol the virtues of Wakanda in its first arc, the country has been largely neglected ever since. Once the wedding was over, the series went on a world tour for four issues, to the US for the next five, and then into parallel alien worlds for at least the next six issues after that. Some characters have paid some lip service to the notion that T'Challa is neglecting his country, but it's the writer who's put him in that position. (Personally, I think that Hudlin painted himself into a corner. He set up a utopian Wakanda, and didn't realize until later how little story potential there is in the country he created. So he sends T'Challa off to fight zombies and Skrulls in a parallel universe instead.)
>
> *Disclaimer* I do not always think I'm right, I do not have a problem admitting I'm wrong, and I don't consider my opinion to be "fact". If I don't write IMO in front of everything I say or I don't tuck my tail between my legs everytime someone disagrees with me it's simply cause...I mean what I say. I don't say something unless I believe it to be true. So if someone tries to police my opinion or pick an arguement over something trivial all I'll simply say is "read the fine print" I also don't care If I make a grammatical or spelling error. Thank you, have a nice day, Hakuna Matata, Live long and Prosper.
>
> Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting
>
> Renegade Comic Forum-Talk about comics with a minimum of modding.
>
> http://s15.invisionfree.com/Renegade_Comic_Forum/index.php?
>
> Insurgency Comic Forum-Where ANYTHING goes.
> http://z10.invisionfree.com/Insurgency_Forums/index.php?act=idx


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