Dave Galanter
December 1st 1969 - December 12th 2020
He was loved.

Black Panther >> View Post
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Post By
Bagheera

In Reply To
Bob Almond

Subj: Great news, but...
Posted: Thu Apr 10, 2008 at 02:02:04 pm EDT (Viewed 15 times)
Reply Subj: CBR: TOP 100 COMIC BOOK RUNS #75-71 (BP#73)
Posted: Thu Apr 10, 2008 at 11:53:07 am EDT

Previous Post

http://goodcomics.comicbookresources.com/2008/04/10/top-100-comic-book-runs-75-71/


73. Christopher Priest’s Black Panther – 130/700 votes (4 first place votes)

Black Panther Vol. 2 #1-62

Kevin Smith and Joe Quesada’s Daredevil was certainly the most eye-catching of all the Marvel Knights revamps of the late 90s, but it was Christopher Priest’s Black Panther that was the underrated success of the group.

Priest’s clever revamp of Panther was built around the concept of introducing a character named Everett Ross, who was sent to Black Panther as a State Department attorney. The creation of Ross, one of the best POV characters out there, allowed Priest to truly play up the almost Batman-like nature of Black Panther, for as distant and Machiavellian as T’Challa might seem, the book always had Ross to ground it in reality (usually with a greet deal of humor, which Priest is quite good at doing).

Priest transformed Panther’s book into a hotbed of political intrigue, especially one notable storyline where Panther has to negotiate with Namor, Magneto AND Dr. Doom to avery a possible World War.

In Black Panther, dialogue and characterization was the key, not action, although there was plenty of that. Under Priest, Panther’s brilliance and his strength became more pronounced - no more was Panther a background character - Priest made him a major player in the Marvel Universe.

A variety of artists worked with Priest during this run, starting with Mark Texeira and Mike Manley, but probably most notably, Sal Velluto and Bob Almond, who, I believe, are responsible for the most issues of Black Panther drawn than ANY other art team!

In a desperate gambit to keep the book from cancellation (as it was never a particularly high-selling comic), Priest spent the last year or so of the book introducing a NEW character as the Black Panther, a New York cop who had taken a Black Panther costume he had found and used it to fight crime in New York, before ultimately taking the name of White Tiger (and starring in the short-lived Priest follow-up series, The Crew).

...you, Sal, and Priest (especially) deserved to be in the Top 10.

No doubt one of THE best runs on a "superhero" ever.

The only contenders that come to mind are Miller's Daredevil and Claremont's initial 15-year run on X-Men.


> http://goodcomics.comicbookresources.com/2008/04/10/top-100-comic-book-runs-75-71/
>
>
> 73. Christopher Priest�s Black Panther � 130/700 votes (4 first place votes)
>
> Black Panther Vol. 2 #1-62
>
> Kevin Smith and Joe Quesada�s Daredevil was certainly the most eye-catching of all the Marvel Knights revamps of the late 90s, but it was Christopher Priest�s Black Panther that was the underrated success of the group.
>
> Priest�s clever revamp of Panther was built around the concept of introducing a character named Everett Ross, who was sent to Black Panther as a State Department attorney. The creation of Ross, one of the best POV characters out there, allowed Priest to truly play up the almost Batman-like nature of Black Panther, for as distant and Machiavellian as T�Challa might seem, the book always had Ross to ground it in reality (usually with a greet deal of humor, which Priest is quite good at doing).
>
> Priest transformed Panther�s book into a hotbed of political intrigue, especially one notable storyline where Panther has to negotiate with Namor, Magneto AND Dr. Doom to avery a possible World War.
>
> In Black Panther, dialogue and characterization was the key, not action, although there was plenty of that. Under Priest, Panther�s brilliance and his strength became more pronounced - no more was Panther a background character - Priest made him a major player in the Marvel Universe.
>
> A variety of artists worked with Priest during this run, starting with Mark Texeira and Mike Manley, but probably most notably, Sal Velluto and Bob Almond, who, I believe, are responsible for the most issues of Black Panther drawn than ANY other art team!
>
> In a desperate gambit to keep the book from cancellation (as it was never a particularly high-selling comic), Priest spent the last year or so of the book introducing a NEW character as the Black Panther, a New York cop who had taken a Black Panther costume he had found and used it to fight crime in New York, before ultimately taking the name of White Tiger (and starring in the short-lived Priest follow-up series, The Crew).

for example:

Jason Beere on page 31 - Avengers #169 by Sal Buscema



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