Dave Galanter
December 1st 1969 - December 12th 2020
He was loved.

Black Panther >> View Post
·
Post By
Bob Almond

In Reply To
Bagheera

Subj: Re: Great news, but...
Posted: Thu Apr 10, 2008 at 01:54:38 pm CDT (Viewed 1 times)
Reply Subj: Great news, but...
Posted: Thu Apr 10, 2008 at 01:02:04 pm CDT (Viewed 15 times)

Previous Post

...you, Sal, and Priest (especially) deserved to be in the Top 10.

No doubt one of THE best runs on a "superhero" ever.

The only contenders that come to mind are Miller's Daredevil and Claremont's initial 15-year run on X-Men.


> http://goodcomics.comicbookresources.com/2008/04/10/top-100-comic-book-runs-75-71/
>
>
> 73. Christopher Priest�s Black Panther � 130/700 votes (4 first place votes)
>
> Black Panther Vol. 2 #1-62
>
> Kevin Smith and Joe Quesada�s Daredevil was certainly the most eye-catching of all the Marvel Knights revamps of the late 90s, but it was Christopher Priest�s Black Panther that was the underrated success of the group.
>
> Priest�s clever revamp of Panther was built around the concept of introducing a character named Everett Ross, who was sent to Black Panther as a State Department attorney. The creation of Ross, one of the best POV characters out there, allowed Priest to truly play up the almost Batman-like nature of Black Panther, for as distant and Machiavellian as T�Challa might seem, the book always had Ross to ground it in reality (usually with a greet deal of humor, which Priest is quite good at doing).
>
> Priest transformed Panther�s book into a hotbed of political intrigue, especially one notable storyline where Panther has to negotiate with Namor, Magneto AND Dr. Doom to avery a possible World War.
>
> In Black Panther, dialogue and characterization was the key, not action, although there was plenty of that. Under Priest, Panther�s brilliance and his strength became more pronounced - no more was Panther a background character - Priest made him a major player in the Marvel Universe.
>
> A variety of artists worked with Priest during this run, starting with Mark Texeira and Mike Manley, but probably most notably, Sal Velluto and Bob Almond, who, I believe, are responsible for the most issues of Black Panther drawn than ANY other art team!
>
> In a desperate gambit to keep the book from cancellation (as it was never a particularly high-selling comic), Priest spent the last year or so of the book introducing a NEW character as the Black Panther, a New York cop who had taken a Black Panther costume he had found and used it to fight crime in New York, before ultimately taking the name of White Tiger (and starring in the short-lived Priest follow-up series, The Crew).

for example:

Jason Beere on page 31 - Avengers #169 by Sal Buscema


I guess if this board was aware of the voting process in advance we'd be higher on the list;-)

Considering it wasn't a great selling book I'm happy to simply be acknowledged for the work we did.

Thanks for the kind words, Bagheera!
Best,
Bob Almond

> ...you, Sal, and Priest (especially) deserved to be in the Top 10.
>
> No doubt one of THE best runs on a "superhero" ever.
>
> The only contenders that come to mind are Miller's Daredevil and Claremont's initial 15-year run on X-Men.
>
>
> > http://goodcomics.comicbookresources.com/2008/04/10/top-100-comic-book-runs-75-71/
> >
> >
> > 73. Christopher Priest’s Black Panther – 130/700 votes (4 first place votes)
> >
> > Black Panther Vol. 2 #1-62
> >
> > Kevin Smith and Joe Quesada’s Daredevil was certainly the most eye-catching of all the Marvel Knights revamps of the late 90s, but it was Christopher Priest’s Black Panther that was the underrated success of the group.
> >
> > Priest’s clever revamp of Panther was built around the concept of introducing a character named Everett Ross, who was sent to Black Panther as a State Department attorney. The creation of Ross, one of the best POV characters out there, allowed Priest to truly play up the almost Batman-like nature of Black Panther, for as distant and Machiavellian as T’Challa might seem, the book always had Ross to ground it in reality (usually with a greet deal of humor, which Priest is quite good at doing).
> >
> > Priest transformed Panther’s book into a hotbed of political intrigue, especially one notable storyline where Panther has to negotiate with Namor, Magneto AND Dr. Doom to avery a possible World War.
> >
> > In Black Panther, dialogue and characterization was the key, not action, although there was plenty of that. Under Priest, Panther’s brilliance and his strength became more pronounced - no more was Panther a background character - Priest made him a major player in the Marvel Universe.
> >
> > A variety of artists worked with Priest during this run, starting with Mark Texeira and Mike Manley, but probably most notably, Sal Velluto and Bob Almond, who, I believe, are responsible for the most issues of Black Panther drawn than ANY other art team!
> >
> > In a desperate gambit to keep the book from cancellation (as it was never a particularly high-selling comic), Priest spent the last year or so of the book introducing a NEW character as the Black Panther, a New York cop who had taken a Black Panther costume he had found and used it to fight crime in New York, before ultimately taking the name of White Tiger (and starring in the short-lived Priest follow-up series, The Crew).


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