DC Universe >> View Post
·
Post By
Daveym 
Moderator

Location: Lancashire
Member Since: Sat May 17, 2008
Posts: 39,855
In Reply To
Ancient One
Moderator

Member Since: Sat May 17, 2008
Posts: 6,905
Subj: Re: Dan DiDio has left DC Comics.
Posted: Tue Feb 25, 2020 at 05:45:07 pm EST (Viewed 144 times)
Reply Subj: Re: Dan DiDio has left DC Comics.
Posted: Mon Feb 24, 2020 at 08:34:12 pm EST (Viewed 142 times)




    Quote:

      Quote:
      I was never a big fan, but unfortunately I'm also quite cynical. I have a bad feeling that his replacement will make me long for the good old days of Dan DiDio.

      Quote:

        Quote:
        To me his legacy will be bringing back Barry Allen unnecessarily

        Quote:

          Quote:
          The one good thing he did (IMO) was giving the go-ahead to bring back Hal Jordan



    Quote:
    I've never understood this ambivalence towards Barry Allen.



    Quote:
    Yes, it's true that his book wasn't great in the 1970's and 80's but then, neither was Hal Jordan's.


I don't quite agree. Barry/Flash was a book that had not sold well for DC in many years, the problem became so worrying it led to editorial and Cary Bates deciding to dispose of Iris in order to free Barry and perhaps inject a new energy into the series. Clearly that didn't work, and for me a large part of the problem was perhaps that Cary Bates had been allowed to stay for far too long by this point and that he was joined somewhere in the issue #290's by Carmine Infantino, an artist who's work by this time was marmite and only appealed when others (like Frank McLaughlin) finished it. When Infantino began finishing his own work the result was atrocious to look at... and this went on for some years.

Green Lantern on the other hand had eventually managed to find its feet again after the O'Neill/Adams & Wolfman/Staton years to land the fresh talents of Len Wein and Dave Gibbons to inject fresh energy into the book. These two were followed by the even more impressive combination of Steve Englehart and Joe Staton (excellent in my view) and when you look at where the two books and character were by the early to mid 80s it should be no real mystery why Green Lantern was never considered for any reboot come 1985 while Barry/Flash gained the pink slip to limbo - his popularity was at rock bottom by this point in time.

We can point to the fact Barry/Flash never had the chance that Green Lantern had had with fresh new talent, and that is true. But I think on balance The Flash was always a very difficult character to write for. Julius Schwartz was always incredibly loyal to his creative talent, writers like Cary Bates were allowed to stay on a title virtually indefinitely. Fresh Modern art-styles were slow to come through. And it is no coincidence that the Crisis reboot occurred in the wake of Schwartz' eventual retirement and a Publisher finally free to embrace the modern world and adopt modern storytelling techniques to appeal to the modern audience... I imagine someone looked at the Flash and saw that Wally West was a natural successor, and just the right age and position to be able to hold up as the Successor to his mentor.

And let's be honest here, Wally West worked amazingly well. \(yes\)






Posted with Google Chrome 70.0.3538.102 on Windows 10
Alvaro's Comicboards powered by On Topic™ © 2003-2018 Powermad Software
All the content of these boards Copyright © 1996-2018 by Alvaro Ortiz and Dave Galanter. Software Copyright © 2003-2018 Powermad Software