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Post By
Omar Karindu

In Reply To
little kon-el

Subj: I think the series walked a line that most people couldn't see...
Posted: Wed Apr 25, 2007 at 08:50:04 am EDT (Viewed 4 times)
Reply Subj: The isssues are worth tracking down...
Posted: Tue Apr 24, 2007 at 01:20:05 pm EDT

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I've picked up Aztek on and off for a while and it was an interesting character to play with in the DCUniverse. His character showed a transition between grim and gritty and lightheartedness. Here was a character that has a very silver-agey origin that is thrust upon a "wildstorm-image grim" city that turns all it's heroes into gun-toting maniacs or insane vigilantes. The series with Aztek showed a character that was lighthearted but could get the job done in a way that didn't stoop to grim and gritty to get the job done. Despite the revelations of his past and his possible future, the character always found a way to look at things in a manner that was both realistic and heroic.

Morrison and Millar were at their top form in writing this character. There are so many little things that added up to the story such a unique story: the stalker/hero groupie, the insane hawksmoor architecture of Vanity, the bewildering and psychedilic threats, and even the last issue where we got to see the top secret initiation of the JLA where heroes must say an oath over the cape, mask and fedora of the Crimson Avenger...the "first" masked man.

Aztek is the first time you see the really neat hints about the Morrison/JLA run and really the first time you see Morrison getting into his Superhero groove in a mainstream book. Well worth the price of admission.

- little kon-el


The basic idea was that Aztek/Uno was a Silver Age superhero in temperament dropped into the darkened, Vertigo and Frank Miller-influenced DCU. His origin, his villains, his supporting cast, and his city were all from the 90s superhero genre and bore the requisite elements of mysticism, conspiracy theory, cynicism, and ultraviolence, but he himself was an old-school hero.

The sheer weirdness of the contrast was what fueled the book; the only other characters who seemed a bit Silver Age-y were, appropriately enough, the Lizard King, who was twisted by those "DCU of the 90s" conspiracy-origin elements into a villain; and Miss Liberty and Mr. America, who similarly turned into Death-Doll and Bloodtype as if they'd been slightly goofy 60s characters put through the post-Crisis grittification process.

And of course the first issue, with the very Silver Age villain the Piper being brutally exterminated by the apotheosis of grim 1990s antiheroism, set that whole contrast up quite nicely. The whole book was sort of about what had happened to the 60s DC characters and publishing ethos.

> I've picked up Aztek on and off for a while and it was an interesting character to play with in the DCUniverse. His character showed a transition between grim and gritty and lightheartedness. Here was a character that has a very silver-agey origin that is thrust upon a "wildstorm-image grim" city that turns all it's heroes into gun-toting maniacs or insane vigilantes. The series with Aztek showed a character that was lighthearted but could get the job done in a way that didn't stoop to grim and gritty to get the job done. Despite the revelations of his past and his possible future, the character always found a way to look at things in a manner that was both realistic and heroic.
>
> Morrison and Millar were at their top form in writing this character. There are so many little things that added up to the story such a unique story: the stalker/hero groupie, the insane hawksmoor architecture of Vanity, the bewildering and psychedilic threats, and even the last issue where we got to see the top secret initiation of the JLA where heroes must say an oath over the cape, mask and fedora of the Crimson Avenger...the "first" masked man.
>
> Aztek is the first time you see the really neat hints about the Morrison/JLA run and really the first time you see Morrison getting into his Superhero groove in a mainstream book. Well worth the price of admission.
>
> - little kon-el
>

- Omar Karindu

"A Renoir. I have three, myself. I had four, but ordered one burned...It
displeased me." -- Doctor Doom

"It's not, 'Oh, they killed Sue Dibney and I always loved that character,' it's 'Oh, they broke a story engine that could have told a thousand stories in order to publish a single 'important' one.'" -- John Seavey


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