Justice League of America >> View Post
Post By
Gernot

In Reply To
Rip Jagger

Subj: Re: Reading JLA 1971-Part 2
Posted: Thu Aug 30, 2007 at 09:13:52 am EDT
Reply Subj: Re: Reading JLA 1971-Part 2
Posted: Tue Aug 28, 2007 at 05:58:28 am EDT

Previous Post

>
> #90 "Plague Of The Pale People" on sale April 18, 1971.
>
> It opens with a girl dying on the beach, coupled with the last line of Eliot's "The Love Song Of J. Alfred Prufrock". Smart assy, but I can live with it. Can't live with the rest of it though. Pasty folks have taken over Atlantis. Teams form and dump them. The plot is solely a device to allow F to plant in jokes about another (presumably) favorite writer, T. S. Eliot. The palefaces worship "the Proof Rock" (get it?) There's also a quote from William Carlos Williams to wrap it up--sort of like putting an Air Wick on a sewer.
>

I can't really argue with you on this. This was one of my early JLofA experiences and nostalgia makes it glow brighter than I'm sure it should. The Dillin-Giella artwork is pretty good, though I didn't much like it then. When I first read this one, I didn't know anything and didn't get the literary references. I read it as a straightforward adventure story, and on that level it's an oddly paced somewhat quiet adventure. Reading it as an adult and mindful of the allusions, I have to say it's wildly amateurish and forced but still oddly charming in its naivete. But that's what DC gets for not giving its veteran writers some decent health insurance! *rhe*

Rip Off

> >
> > #90 "Plague Of The Pale People" on sale April 18, 1971.
> >
> > It opens with a girl dying on the beach, coupled with the last line of Eliot's "The Love Song Of J. Alfred Prufrock". Smart assy, but I can live with it. Can't live with the rest of it though. Pasty folks have taken over Atlantis. Teams form and dump them. The plot is solely a device to allow F to plant in jokes about another (presumably) favorite writer, T. S. Eliot. The palefaces worship "the Proof Rock" (get it?) There's also a quote from William Carlos Williams to wrap it up--sort of like putting an Air Wick on a sewer.
> >
>
> I can't really argue with you on this. This was one of my early JLofA experiences and nostalgia makes it glow brighter than I'm sure it should. The Dillin-Giella artwork is pretty good, though I didn't much like it then. When I first read this one, I didn't know anything and didn't get the literary references. I read it as a straightforward adventure story, and on that level it's an oddly paced somewhat quiet adventure. Reading it as an adult and mindful of the allusions, I have to say it's wildly amateurish and forced but still oddly charming in its naivete. But that's what DC gets for not giving its veteran writers some decent health insurance! *rhe*
>
> Rip Off

This book marked Aquaman's return to the League, didn't it? I recall Denny O'Neil not knowing what to do with him, so he just ignored him.

Years later, they said Aquaman had taken a leave of absence, because the timing with his search for Mera came together so nicely.

Gernot...

*The Justice League Of America Board

*The Cartoon Board

My MySpace

My YouTube Channel

My Yahoo Clubs!

Superman, Man Of Tomorrow

To Be Continued

Kartoon Klub