Justice Society of America >> View Post
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Post By
Pre-Crisis Chris

In Reply To
Mikel Midnight

Subj: Re: What was horrible about the SO#31 version?
Posted: Sat Apr 28, 2007 at 10:43:34 am EDT (Viewed 1 times)
Reply Subj: Re: What was horrible about the SO#31 version?
Posted: Tue Apr 10, 2007 at 12:18:24 pm EDT (Viewed 1 times)

Previous Post

> > Well, in my mind we had Roy Thomas at his worst, rewriting (I mean, adapting) a story that was only a few years old and adding all of his 1980s overly verbose and faux-historical flourishes that ultimately killed All-Star Squadron for me. Yes, we had to get rid of Superman and Batman, but the new version left a bad taste in my mouth when compared to the wonderful Levitz original, cheesy as it may have been.
>
> The Levitz-Staton-Layton version is exquisite for sure. I'd have to agree alas that much of Roy's later stuff for the JSofA and A-SS was a tad too pedantic to maintain its momentum. Having to go back and excise such key heroes from these classic tales was unfortunate and the whole endeavor has a feeling of straightening furniture rather than designing a new room. :-/

As much as I am not a fan of A*S, I don't believe this was a task Roy particularly relished. However, it's as reasonable a job of making the story work sans Superman as anyone would do.

It's water under the bridge anyway, as of course DC won't even stick to the SO#31 but will give us yet a third origin for the team (I'd be happy to be proven wrong, but it would be standard operating procedure for them).

> > > Well, in my mind we had Roy Thomas at his worst, rewriting (I mean, adapting) a story that was only a few years old and adding all of his 1980s overly verbose and faux-historical flourishes that ultimately killed All-Star Squadron for me. Yes, we had to get rid of Superman and Batman, but the new version left a bad taste in my mouth when compared to the wonderful Levitz original, cheesy as it may have been.
> >
> > The Levitz-Staton-Layton version is exquisite for sure. I'd have to agree alas that much of Roy's later stuff for the JSofA and A-SS was a tad too pedantic to maintain its momentum. Having to go back and excise such key heroes from these classic tales was unfortunate and the whole endeavor has a feeling of straightening furniture rather than designing a new room. :-/
>
> As much as I am not a fan of A*S, I don't believe this was a task Roy particularly relished. However, it's as reasonable a job of making the story work sans Superman as anyone would do.
>
> It's water under the bridge anyway, as of course DC won't even stick to the SO#31 but will give us yet a third origin for the team (I'd be happy to be proven wrong, but it would be standard operating procedure for them).

I'm sorry but I must totally disagree with much of what you're saying. Roy Thomas' work was some of the best ever in comics. Its just that the topic is somewhat esoteric, and perhaps old fashioned to a certain segment of the comic buying public....All Star Squadron's concept, and Thomas' efforts (to tell stories of the golden age heroes in their prime during world war 2, and to clean up DC continuity) was not a "Marvel-Zombie" type of book. It appealed to a different, perhaps smaller base of fans (although I had enough of my own friends and aquaintances who loved the book and Thomas' work.)

The very beauty of his work, was the mixing of real life history, literary/popular culture history, and (then) 40 years worth of comic book history into an amazing series of stories. He handled Retconning how it should be handled.....he didn't try to destroy everything you knew, he tried to fill in gaps, clear up things that were never explained, and added to, rather than eliminated. When he did alter story elements, it was all in the spirit of the original, and it made sense to do so. Another element I loved was his use of footnotes, and flashbacks....it was very much like you were reading a piece of history....his notes on the letters page, with the reference points to older comic stories, and the obvious care and love he put into his work made the series a pleasure to read. This was a truly unique series.

Unfortunately, he had no choice but to elminate the golden age Batman, Superman from the JSA origin....as anyone else would have had to do. DC eliminated them from the single universe continuity. There was no choice in the matter. I think he did the best he could, under the circumstances.

Why is there so much of a distaste for Thomas' DC work these days?? I'm shocked, as I feel he did more to clean up DC's parallel earths continuity issues, than almost anyone else did. DC's problem was never parallel earths, or alternate futures....it was that they didn't have the proper editorial staff in place, watching over their comics line. They used to keep everything they created, and no one ever tried to manage it in any way. This led to all kinds of continuity problems. That was the main problem for the company as they moved towards COIE. DC needed just a few more people like Thomas, as their editors, and they would never have ever needed COIE. The multiverse was the best!And so was Thomas' DC work (All Star Squadron was an awesome series!)

Again, as to why the JSA origin was so bad in Secret Origins....it would mainly be that DC had changed from a multiverse to a single universe, so you had to alter/fix the original origin story to account for Superman and Batman no longer being a part of it. But that was an error on DC's part for going through with the destruction/removal of the multiverse, and not a problem on Roy Thomas's skill as a writer.


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