Marvel Universe >> View Post
Post By
Tiger Shark

In Reply To
Attok12

Subj: Agree About Both Points
Posted: Wed Apr 04, 2007 at 11:29:27 am EDT
Reply Subj: Grim Reaper And Man-Ape
Posted: Wed Apr 04, 2007 at 11:05:29 am EDT

Previous Post

I agree with you about seeing Man Ape wearing a robe OVER his costume. That wasn't really right. But I thought the Grim Reaper was written well. While I can see why you disliked the scence featuring the Reaper's head in the toilet, I thought it was fine because Misty was using it as an interrogation technique, one I've seen before. If the Reaper just stuck his head in the toilet for whatever reason, then I wouldn't have liked it. But that's not what happened. Meanwhile, the writers reminded us of the Grim Reaper's racism, as well as showed just how much of a bastard he is when he just outright murdered poor Saboteur by slicing her head off -- just because she said the wrong thing at the wrong time. That was a genuinely surprising moment for me that had much more meaning than, say, the "I saw it coming a mile away" so-called shocker of an ending to CIVIL WAR #2, where Spidey unmasked. *yawn*

Yes, I have no problem with the Man-Ape wearing a bathrobe or frying some eggs in the morning---but NOT in his costume. The same with the reaper--it would have been interesting to see Erik out of costume, in a bathrobe, sitting at the table and thinking.

But not out of costume and sitting on the john, hoping the laxitive he took before bed will work, while the Man-Ape belches and fries eggs in his bathrobe, and complains about the smell from the bathroom.

When the writer writes in such characters strolling around the house in their costumes with an old bathrobe thrown over it, it's icon-breaking, and done on purpose--"he-he-he, ain't I a funny one."

And while neither the GR or the MA may be objectively iconic in the Red Skull, Kang, Ultron, Thanos, or Doctor Doom sense, to me they are Marvel Icons, due to my long history with them in decades when they whupped a lot of hero butt and were treated with full respect by their creators and later writers than used them.