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Post By
TJ Burns

In Reply To
Omar Karindu

Subj: Re: Which part about the SHRA do you hate/like? nt
Posted: Thu Jun 12, 2008 at 04:17:25 pm CDT
Reply Subj: Re: Which part about the SHRA do you hate/like? nt
Posted: Thu Jun 12, 2008 at 03:08:38 pm CDT

Previous Post

>
> Like: the idea that everyone that is going to be a superhero has to have Avengers-quality training and police authority. It greatly decreases the accidental deaths during rescues, or situations going totally out of control.

It also throws out entirely the "novice hero learning the ropes as he/she goes" premise, the one that, for example, Spider-Man practically relies on.

It's one of those dreadful bits like Reed Richards selling his supertechnology on the consumer market that makes perfect sense until you realize what it does to the premises and parameters of the entire superhero genre. Superheroes are often fun to read about because they aren't law enforcement professionals with training and a handy ID badge.

> Dislike: the requirement that if you have super-powers, then you MUST use them as a superhero. Which, near as I can tell, is quietly going by the wayside as Butterball's time with the Initiative has shown.
>
> TJB

- Omar Karindu

"A Renoir. I have three, myself. I had four, but ordered one burned...It displeased me." -- Doctor Doom

"It's not, 'Oh, they killed Sue Dibney and I always loved that character,' it's 'Oh, they broke a story engine that could have told a thousand stories in order to publish a single 'important' one.'" -- John Seavey

> >
> > Like: the idea that everyone that is going to be a superhero has to have Avengers-quality training and police authority. It greatly decreases the accidental deaths during rescues, or situations going totally out of control.
>
> It also throws out entirely the "novice hero learning the ropes as he/she goes" premise, the one that, for example, Spider-Man practically relies on.

Not so much. It just means that said novice wants his secret ID protected from the government... and adds the usual "world's against me" sort of drama an extra layer of danger. (Imagine the concern of the Thunderbolts coming after said novice. Good for drama!) It also codifies exactly why the police are so eager to jump on, say, Spider-Man, every time someone frames him for something. ("If he were on the up-and-up, he'd register!") It adds to those situations, rather than take them away. (Characters a newbie learning the ropes but is registered? Hey, look, he's a cast member in Avengers: The Initiative instead.)

> It's one of those dreadful bits like Reed Richards selling his supertechnology on the consumer market that makes perfect sense until you realize what it does to the premises and parameters of the entire superhero genre. Superheroes are often fun to read about because they aren't law enforcement professionals with training and a handy ID badge.

I agree... and that's why the anti-registration types being a going concern is VITAL to the MU's use of the act. If either side utterly wins and no one opposes or agitates for the other side, the drama potential it offers is lost. Let's face it: certain heroes aren't suited for the "alone and hunted" sort of plot. Same for the "learning curve" sort of idea. But others thrive on it, and it's got to be a lot more interesting for us readers to see those guys have the extra level of enforcement to work past. It used to make little sense that none of the Avengers would ever speak up for Spider-Man in the situations where he was hunted if they shared a universe. Now? It's a lot easier to explain why... and the higher level of opposition they have to face to remain free than just a few police officers adds to the potential threat. (A few cops aren't ever going to be enough to stop Spider-Man. A platoon of SHIELD agents or another hero, on the other hand...)

Note that the X-Men do NOT work under Registration as it is currently written. (We provide young mutants training in their powers. No, wait, the government does that. Well, we prevent the racist policies of the government from forcing young mutants to register. Well, the Act's non-racially based and all mutants are considered registered automatically, so we basically leave them alone.) I'm honestly not sure how to make them work, either.

Other than privatizing the anti-mutant conspiracies, of course. Which works, but then begs the question of why they don't ask the government teams for help when Steven Lang spends 46 million dollars on a Sentinel attack. Shouldn't someone be monitoring that, and be decent enough to, well, send help? The best solution is to have the X-Men as a fully-licensed team and training facility to train young mutants in the use of their powers, but even that smacks of separate-but-equal education.


TJB


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