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Post By
Evil G:DR

In Reply To
Comicguy1

Subj: Hazardous working environment, no extra pay.
Posted: Tue Apr 29, 2014 at 10:03:15 pm EDT (Viewed 76 times)
Reply Subj: Re: Who Is/Was Hazard?
Posted: Sat Apr 19, 2014 at 01:45:22 am EDT (Viewed 93 times)

Previous Post

And yes, the 90's pretty much was the nadir for the X-Books (And I actually grew up on, read and enjoyed those books. I still think the SL and FN runs are very good on the whole.). It really took the arrival of Grant Morrison to make the books accessible again.



This is Hazard, introduced in X-Men #12-13, Nicieza's first issues as the regular writer of the book. Hazard was Carter Ryking, a childhood friend of Charles Xavier, he could fly, generate and blast plasma energy, and channelled that energy through tasers built into his costume.

Hazard's father, Alexander Ryking, worked alongside Xavier's father and his stepfather Wayne Marko. He was incarcerated in some kind of super-asylum, but news of his father's death made him go crazygonuts, and sent him on a rampage to try and expose how his father and his co-workers had experimented him (and Xavier as well?), believing this is what made him a mutant.

The X-Men defeated him and he ended up being locked away again, and made a brief appearance during the Gambit solo book, and Nicieza would revisit "what was Xavier's father involved with?" again in the 'X-Men Forever' miniseries, but without bringing back Hazard.

Hazard lost his powers on M-Day, and returned in the Xavier-centric era of Carey's X-Men Legacy, only to die, a victim of Sinister's efforts to resurrect himself, which really felt like a waste of a potentially-interesting character, who was largely a blank slate, and could have been a recurring guy in an Xavier-centric series.

> And yes, the 90's pretty much was the nadir for the X-Books (And I actually grew up on, read and enjoyed those books. I still think the SL and FN runs are very good on the whole.). It really took the arrival of Grant Morrison to make the books accessible again.

There are so many things wrong with that paragraph, I don't even know where to start. You could not be more wrong. You could try, but you would not succeed. In short, no, the 1990s were not the nadir. Arguably that period where UXM was just a reprint book, but in terms of "actual new material being published", the '00s have been the worst decade for the core X-Men books, because it's the decade where they completely lost track of what the X-Men are supposed to be all about (in addition to a general level of not being very good). Anything from the point where they move onto that damned island has failed at being an X-Men story before it even began.

And whether you love or hate the one book Morrison wrote (remember, everyone; friends don't let friends enjoy New-X-Men), that was JUST ONE BOOK. He didn't do squat for the eleventy-five other X-Men comics that were being published at the time, or the "accessibility" of the franchise as a whole. By creating an environment of "this is the only X-Men book that matters, the only one where anything important will happen", he did just the opposite, and we got that thing where there's only a few books that "matter". Contrast this to the 1980s and 1990s, where just about every book mattered and could justify it's existence in terms other than "this will sell enough to turn a profit for Marvel".

On a related note, I'm beyond tired of how so many vocal people keep on talking about the 2001-4 Jemas-run Marvel as being some kind of golden renaissance, just because there were one or two books they loved, and ignoring how much utter garbage, filth, bilge and sewage there was during that time period, and how there was a sort of company-wide sense of embarrassment to be writing and publishing superhero comics, and so elements that were super and/or heroic got toned down or thrown out entirely.


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